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Q.

What Einstein regarded as'' my biggest blunder"?

Tags: education, science, biggest blunder
Asked by Om Shrivastava, 30 Oct '12 11:31 pm
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Answers (8)

1.

In 1939, on the eve of the Second World War, Albert Einstein wrote a fateful letter to the American President, Franklin Roosevelt.he letter was about an application of Einstein's famous equation, e=mc. And his fear that the Nazis could use it to build an atomic bomb. His letter set off a chain of events which led to the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Albert Einstein regarded writing this letter as the greatest mistake of his life. This is the story of his famous equation. And how e=mc changed history and Einstein forever.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 31 Oct '12 05:13 am

 
  
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2.

His postulation of a cosmological constant
Answered by Anil K Chugh, 05 Nov '12 08:01 pm

 
  
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3.

Einstein was debating if the universe was expanding or contracting. In the end, he decided it was in equilibrium. So in writing his equations to describe the gravity in the universe, he had to included a fudge factor to put the universe in equilibrium.

Within his life, it was proved that the universe was expanding at a rapid rate and his "fudge factor" concept was wrong.

He called it his biggest blunder.
Answered by anantharaman, 31 Oct '12 08:59 am

 
  
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4.

E=mc
Answered by iqbal seth, 31 Oct '12 08:29 am

 
  
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5.

Einstein was debating if the universe was expanding or contracting. In the end, he decided it was in equilibrium. So in writing his equations to describe the gravity in the universe, he had to included a fudge factor to put the universe in equilibrium.

Within his life, it was proved that the universe was expanding at a rapid rate and his "fudge factor" concept was wrong.

He called it his biggest blunder.
Source: google search
Answered by anil garg, 31 Oct '12 07:52 pm

 
  
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6.

He disclosed his atom bomb project to president of America.
Answered by ysivasubramanyam, 31 Oct '12 04:07 am

 
  
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7.

Einstein's remark has become part of the folklore of physics, but was he right? He certainly had cause to feel rueful about the cosmological constant; he had introduced it into his general theory of relativity in 1917, as a last resort, to force the equations to yield a static universe. Even at the time, he apologized for doing so, because it spoiled the elegant simplicity of the field equations that he had struggled so hard to find. Of course the universe is not static, just as his original equations were trying to tell him; his blindness lost him the chance to make one of the great predictions in physics. Even worse, a little more analysis would have shown that his static universe was not stable, and would have started to expand or contract if its perfect equilibrium was disturbed in any way.
The most banal reason for Einstein's blunder might have been a simple failure to think through the consequences of his own ideas (in itself, very unusual for Einstein, but he was mentally an ...more
Source: http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/~jpl/cosmo/blunder.html
Answered by DaKet the rabel, 30 Oct '12 11:38 pm

 
  
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8.

..cosmological constant.
(but like whatever King Midas touched turned to gold, this cosmological constant was also later proved to be correct pp.
Answered by M H Kisan, 31 Oct '12 12:09 am

 
  
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