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Q.

What is the direct impact of the policy of Doctrine of Lapse?

Asked by jameel ahmed, 29 Aug '08 02:49 pm
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Answers (2)

 
1.

A multiplicity of motives underlay the British penetration into India: commerce, security, and a purported moral uplift of the people. The "expansive force" of private and company trade eventually led to the conquest or annexation of territories in which spices, cotton, and opium were produced. British investors ventured into the unfamiliar interior landscape in search of opportunities that promised substantial profits. British economic penetration was aided by Indian collaborators, such as the bankers and merchants who controlled intricate credit networks. British rule in India would have been a frustrated or half-realized dream had not Indian counterparts provided connections between rural and urban centers. External threats, both real and imagined, such as the Napoleonic Wars (1796-1815) and Russian expansion toward Afghanistan (in the 1830s), as well as the desire for internal stability, led to the annexation of more territory in India. Political analysts in Britain wav ...more
Answered by mohd yousuf, 29 Aug '08 03:17 pm

 
  
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The Sepoy Mutiny of 1857
Answered by RAJAN MHAMAI, 29 Aug '08 03:02 pm

 
  
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