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Q.

What do the ballad's say about Robin Hood /

Tags: sports, education, books
Asked by Iqbal Seth, 17 Apr '12 09:17 pm
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Answers (4)

 
1.

The 19th century ballad scholar Francis Child collected 38 separate Robin Hood ballads (and variant versions of them) in his ballad collection -- as well as a few other ballads which featured Robin Hood in some versions but not in others. Composed over hundreds of years, these ballads form the Robin Hood legend. Scenes from these tales have been used in many novels, movies and television shows.

Other sites have large ballad collections. I don't wish to duplicate their efforts. So, I only offer a handful of ballads.

I have used ballads from the 17th century and afterwards. I prefer the earlier ballads, but I think these later ones are written in easily understood English and don't need footnotes.

Also, I've included Alfred Noyes' Sherwood. And you'll find the first of Clayton Emery's Robin and Marian mysteries here too. And finally I've added two comic book stories from the 1950s.

You can also play one of the tunes used for many of the ballads.
Answered by jameel ahmed, 17 Apr '12 09:18 pm

 
  
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2.

The ballads say that King Richard Plantagenet was a good King. Giving him a noble title of Richard The Lion Hearted. Yet he was away more years from England then on her beloved soil. He became obsessed with fighting his Holy wars, and less concerned with helping his own people. Heavy taxes were laid throughout England. To support his battles in the crusades, and later to pay for a heavy ransom when he was captured by Leopold V, duke of Austria. He was fatally wounded by an arrow in an insignificant skirmish away from England, in 1199.
Answered by anil garg, 18 Mar '13 10:49 pm

 
  
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3.

Robin Hood ballads are usually found between the years of 1100 and the 1400s.
Sherwood Forest is claimed to have been his home. The early stories sing of him being a highway robber, staying one step ahead of the Evil Sheriff of Notingham.
The more romantic tales to appear later. Portray him as a man wrongfully having his noble title taken away from him. His father brutally murdered while away at the crusades.
Many Ballads were written and sung of the outlaw, Robin Hood. They depicted a man of great courage and generosity. He was said to have an unrivaled skill in archery. To the point of being mystical. He never turned away from a battle. He stole from his enemies, the nobleman.
Yet he aided the poor, and protected the women and children.

Robin has had many names throughout the years.
Answered by jakir hussain, 17 Apr '12 09:21 pm

 
  
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4.

The oldest surviving ballad, Robin Hood and the Monk, gives even less support to the picture of Robin Hood as a partisan of the true king. The setting of the early ballads is usually attributed by scholars to either the 13th century or the 14th, although it is recognised they are not necessarily historically consistent.The early ballads are also quite clear on Robin Hood's social status: he is a yeoman. While the precise meaning of this term changed over time, including free retainers of an aristocrat and small landholders, it always referred to commoners. The essence of it in the present context was "neither a knight nor a peasant or 'husbonde' but something in between". We know that artisans (such as millers) were among those regarded as "yeomen" in the 14th century. From the 16th century on, there were attempts to elevate Robin Hood to the nobility and in two extremely influential plays Anthony Munday presented him at the very end of the 16th century as the Earl of Huntingdon, as he ...more
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 17 Apr '12 09:18 pm

 
  
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