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Q.

What causes black algae in swimming pools?

Tags: science, environment, home decor
Asked by gurpreet, 22 Dec '12 01:03 am
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Answers (28)

 
1.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.

Pools that lack the proper filtration or that have filtration systems clogged from debris can quickly experience problems. One of the signs of problems with pool filtration is the presence of cloudy or milky water. If the problem is not remedied in a timely fashion, this can quickly lead to an outbreak of black algae.

The chlorine used in pools helps to keep the pool free of bacteria and algae growths by maintaining the water at levels of toxicity above the normal tolerance levels of unwanted organisms. The level of chlorine dissipates with loss of water, heat, and the natural breakdown of ...more
Answered by jafar, 22 Dec '12 01:14 am

 
  
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2.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.
Answered by Girish Nakhtare, 14 Sep '13 09:42 am

 
  
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3.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.
Answered by Chinja Ray, 14 Sep '13 09:40 am

 
  
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4.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.
Answered by Kapil Sahni, 14 Sep '13 09:39 am

 
  
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5.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.
Answered by Ekram Murthy, 14 Sep '13 09:36 am

 
  
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6.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.
Answered by Lusila Tailor, 14 Sep '13 09:33 am

 
  
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7.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.
Answered by Shalya Dorjee, 14 Sep '13 09:31 am

 
  
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8.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.
Answered by Mehtar Misra, 14 Sep '13 09:28 am

 
  
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9.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.
Answered by Omparkash Mukhopadhyay, 14 Sep '13 09:26 am

 
  
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10.

Leaves and dirt that enter a pool are excellent sources of algae spores. The longer that leaves and dirt are permitted to clutter the pool bottom, the dirtier the pool will get and the more likely that black algae will appear on pool surfaces. In pools that are particularly dirty, the black algae may continue to bloom even if the chlorine levels are boosted well beyond normal treatment levels.
Answered by Deven Prasad, 14 Sep '13 09:24 am

 
  
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