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Q.

What are the effect of radiations ??????? suggest any book ?

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Asked by henna khosla, 09 Feb '12 07:30 pm
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Answers (3)

1.

Go to Google and you will find information to your heart's content. Interesting would be to see the effect of radiation from high tension cables on the human body. Do you know that you can also light a bulb without connection to a source of power? That can also be found there. These high tension cables are illness and death bringing.
Source: Lots of places
Answered by Ramesh Lahoti, 10 Feb '12 08:54 pm

 
  
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2.

Radiation's biological effect on a person's body is commonly measured in microsieverts.

At one point today, Japan's stricken Fukushima reactor No. 2 was reported to have been emitting up to 8217 microsieverts of radiation.

As a comparison, a person can expect to be exposed to 20 microsieverts from a single chest x-ray, 240 microsieverts from the food they eat every year, 350 microsieverts annually from radiation that comes in through the Earth's atmosphere from space, and around 3000 microsieverts from a single CT scan.

The International Atomic Energy Agency says an average person can expect to be exposed to around 2400 microsieverts per year.

To get ill from a sudden dose of radiation, you would need to be exposed to around 1 million microsieverts (or 1 sievert). Four million will drop your chances of survival to 50 percent.

Six to seven million microsieverts will kill you.
Source: google search
Answered by anil garg, 10 Feb '12 05:58 pm

 
  
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3.

EFFECT OF RADIATION ON HUMANS

A very small amount of ionizing radiation could trigger cancer in the long term even though it may take decades for the cancer to appear. Ionizing radiation (x-rays, radon gas, radioactive material) can cause leukemia and thyroid cancer. There is no doubt that radiation can cause cancer, but there still is a question of what level of radiation it takes to cause cancer. Rapidly dividing cells are more susceptible to radiation damage. Examples of radiosensitive cells are blood forming cells (bone marrow), intestinal lining, hair follicles and fetuses. Hence, these develop cancer first.

If a person is exposed to radiation, especially high dose, there are predictable changes in our body that can be measured. The number of blood cells, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in the blood cells and the amount of radioactive material in urine, are examples of biomarkers that can indicate if one is exposured high dose. If you do not have early biological c ...more
Answered by ajay, 09 Feb '12 07:32 pm

 
  
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