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Q.

What about the stop loss for placing buy order? Please provide with example.

Tags: money, health, stop loss
Asked by Bikash kanodia, 18 Apr '13 07:11 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit an investor's loss on a security position.

Also known as a "stop order" or "stop-market order".

Investopedia explains 'Stop-Loss Order'
Setting a stop-loss order for 10% below the price you paid for the stock will limit your loss to 10%. This strategy allows investors to determine their loss limit in advance, preventing emotional decision-making.

It's also a great idea to use a stop order before you leave for holidays or enter a situation in which you will be unable to watch your stocks for an extended period of time.
Source: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/stop-lossorder.asp
Answered by Quest, 19 Apr '13 10:49 am

 
  
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2.

Stop Loss is an order placed with a broker to buy or sell once the stock reaches a certain price. A stop-loss is designed to limit an investor's loss on a security position.
Answered by anil garg, 19 Apr '13 02:07 am

 
  
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3.

Different types of orders allow you to be more specific about how you'd like your broker to fulfill your trades. When you place a stop or limit order, you are telling your broker that you don't want the market price (the current price at which a stock is trading), but that you want the stock price to move in a certain direction before your order is executed.

With a stop order, your trade will be executed only when the security you want to buy or sell reaches a particular price (the stop price). Once the stock has reached this price, a stop order essentially becomes a market order and is filled. For instance, if you own stock ABC, which currently trades at $20, and you place a stop order to sell it at $15, your order will only be filled once stock ABC drops below $15. Also known as a "stop-loss order", this allows you to limit your losses. However, this type of order can also be used to guarantee profits. For example, assume that you bought stock XYZ at $10 per share and now the stoc ...more
Answered by vedprakash sharma, 18 Apr '13 09:49 pm

 
  
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4.

Plz contact ur trading agent.
Answered by MAdhavan Avadhany, 18 Apr '13 07:33 pm

 
  
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