Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

After the end of World War II, Balkan Countries in East Europe came under the indirect rule of Soviets. People of these countries & the USSR itself, were shunned frm western/outside world. The infamous Berlin Wall was built preventing East Germans crossing over into West Germany.
This Soviet re-structuring was later came to be known as "Iron Curtain", world over. Do u know which European Statesman first coined this term of "Iron Curtain" ?

Cocktail Raj

Asked by Cocktail, 30 May '08 01:03 pm
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (10)

1.

The origin of this term began in theatres in the 18th century to prevent fire from spreading from the stage to the audience since many of the props and material used on stage were highly inflammable. A fire proof curtain was made which was called the Iron Curtain. Many theatres in countries like Germany, Norway, France, Russia took to using this fireproof curtain.

A book published in 1819 contains the sentence : On the 19th November we crossed the river Bethawa, and as if an iron curtain had dropped between us and the avenging angel, the deaths diminished. So, soon this term began being used in books as well. By 1904, when HG Wells, in his novel The Food of the Gods, placed an iron curtain between an oblivious scientist and the "outer world", it was an eerily complete barrier through which no communication could pass.

By this time, the Iron Curtain was ready to find a new theatre in the world of international relations as Europe began dividing into rivalrous nati ...more
Answered by nargis bhambi, 01 Jun '08 01:30 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

The first recorded use of the term iron curtain was derived from the safety curtain used in theatres and first applied to the border of communist Russia as "an impenetrable barrier" in 1920 by Ethel Snowden, in her book Through Bolshevik Russia. [3] It was used during World War II by German Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels and later Count Lutz Schwerin von Krosigk in the last days of the war. The former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill used the phrase in telegrams to President Truman on 1945 May 12 and 1945 June 4.[4] However, its use was not popularized until Churchill used it in his "Sinews of Peace" address March 5, 1946, at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri:

Answered by ANURADHA PATHAKJ, 30 May '08 01:10 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

And against NATO, Soviets formed Warsaw Pact. That is history now. There is no more polarisation and it is good for the world.
Answered by kamal mehra, 31 May '08 10:31 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

MR WINSTON CHURCHCHIL --THE FORMER BRITISH PM.
HIS ANOTHER INFAMOUS HISTORICAL COINAGE IS "NAKED FAKIR'"
USED AGAINST MAHATMA GANDHI.
Answered by HARIJIBAN BANERJEE, 30 May '08 03:59 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
5.

Actually the term "Iron Curtain" was coined by German politician Lutz Graf Schwerin von Krosigk, but made popular by Winston Churchill, who first used it in a public speech in March of 1946. The term was first used to refer to the actual metal barrier that cut the continent in two, but it soon became a reference to the ideological barrier also. When Churchill first referred to the barrier he wasn't trying to emulate the words of von Krosigk. In a telegram directed to US President Harry S. Truman, Churchill spoke about the European situation and said "An iron curtain is drawn down upon their front. We do not know what is going on behind." This became the first official mention of the term Iron Curtain.
Answered by Joseph Chacko, 31 May '08 05:30 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
6.

Since the Main question relates to asking the name of the European Statesman who first coined the term of "Iron Cutrain" the answer goes as under :-
QUOTE -German politician and Nazi Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels was the first to refer to an "Iron Curtain" coming down across Europe after World War II, in a manifesto he published in the German newspaper Das Reich in February 1945.[1] [2] The term was not widely used until March 5, 1946, when Winston Churchill popularised it in his address Sinews of Peace." UNQUOTE ....SOURCE - WIKIPEDIA

Answered by s k mutreja, 31 May '08 10:01 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
7.

The term was used by neo nazis like Leon DeGrille. But it was coined originally by Gobbels & Co., to make the SOviet regimes look barbaric. The leader who popularized the name, was ironically....WInston Churchill. Speaking of "Iron curtains".....

Anyway, a minor correction dost.

Balkan countries were only Albania & Yugoslavia. SFR Yugoslavia quit from Warsaw Pact in 1948 and later formed NAM with us. And Albania till Stalin's death was indirectly ruled by USSR. After Stalin's death, Albania became close to Mao Tse Tsung and distanced themselves from Kruchavite USSR onwards. And the Albanians remained Pro Chinese (even in Sino-Soviet split, Albania sided w/ China) well until 1979, when they attempted to win over the hearts of the Janta regime in India.

But as far as Balkan's went, Yugoslavs had more travel freedom than say- Britishers even. Britishers could only travel within NATO countries. East Germans could only travel within the Warsaw Pact. But Yug ...more
Answered by A Moin, 10 Jun '08 09:11 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
8.

The European diplomat who first referred to the Soviet blackout of the Eastern Euripe was Sir Winston Cchurchill,the then P.M. of England
Answered by radhikamruta, 05 Jun '08 08:17 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining

Related Answer

Q.
A

The Royal College of St Peter in Westminster is locally and simply known as Westminster School. It is one of the major boys independence schools in Br..more

Answered by amit singh