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Q.

The process of meditation as described in Kaivalya Upanishad?

Tags: religion & spirituality, upanishad, kaivalya upanishad
Asked by sudhakar kuruvada, 27 Mar '13 06:15 am
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Answers (3)

 
1.

Meditation being the means of realization, that process is now elaborately discussed. One should sit comfortably in a quiet place, keeping the trunk, neck and head straight. The mind should be freed from all attachments and from thoughts of the past and future. The senses should remain calm and controlled. The aspirant should mentally salute his/her guru. The heart should be visualised as a full-blown lotus, pure and shining. In that, one should visualise Siva seated with his consort Uma by his side. It is important that a form of God should be adopted for meditation in the beginning, for Brahman, the formless ultimate Reality, cannot be initially grasped otherwise. As Brahman is never separate from its Sakti, Uma has to be visualised as being seated by the side of Siva. Though the Upanishad particularly mentions Siva-Parvati as the object of meditation, any form of God can be adopted, as long as the aspirant remembers that that form is a representation of Brahman.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 27 Mar '13 06:26 am

 
  
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2.

One should sit comfortably in a quiet place, keeping the trunk, neck and head straight. The mind should be freed from all attachments and from thoughts of the past and future. The senses should remain calm and controlled. The aspirant should mentally salute his/her guru. The heart should be visualised as a full-blown lotus, pure and shining. In that, one should visualise Siva seated with his consort Uma by his side. It is important that a form of God should be adopted for meditation in the beginning, for Brahman, the formless ultimate Reality, cannot be initially grasped otherwise. As Brahman is never separate from its Sakti, Uma has to be visualised as being seated by the side of Siva. Though the Upanishad particularly mentions Siva-Parvati as the object of meditation, any form of God can be adopted, as long as the aspirant remembers that that form is a representation of Brahman.
Answered by Quest, 27 Mar '13 12:20 pm

 
  
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3.

Meditation being the means of realization, that process is now elaborately discussed. One should sit comfortably in a quiet place, keeping the trunk, neck and head straight. The mind should be freed from all attachments and from thoughts of the past and future. The senses should remain calm and controlled. The aspirant should mentally salute his/her guru. The heart should be visualised as a full-blown lotus, pure and shining. In that, one should visualise Siva seated with his consort Uma by his side. It is important that a form of God should be adopted for meditation in the beginning, for Brahman, the formless ultimate Reality, cannot be initially grasped otherwise. As Brahman is never separate from its Sakti, Uma has to be visualised as being seated by the side of Siva. Though the Upanishad particularly mentions Siva-Parvati as the object of meditation, any form of God can be adopted, as long as the aspirant remembers that that form is a representation of Brahman.
Answered by iqbal seth, 27 Mar '13 07:28 am

 
  
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