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Q.

The Dasamukha Ravana ---the symbolism behind the faces?

Tags: ravana, religion & spirituality, dasamukha ravana
Asked by sudhakar kuruvada, 09 Mar '13 07:16 pm
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Answers (6)

 
1.

While the ten-headed, twenty-armed figure of Ravana as the supreme anti-hero, is familiar to every Indian and scholars of Indian mythology, few really know why he is portrayed in this manner. Traditonal Indian wisdom places importance on the control of ones emotions and projectsthe intellect alone, as being supreme.
The great King Mahabali, advises Ravana to shun the other nine base emotions of anger; pride; ealousy; happiness; sadness; fear; selfishness; passion; and ambition. Intellect alone is to be revered. Indian spiritual gurus have always stressed the need to overcome the Self and have considered these emotions detrimental to the elevation of the soul.
But, in his reponse to Mahabali, Ravana justifies and exults in the possession of all these ten facets, as they make him a complete man. Mythology thus portrays Ravana as Dasamukha, or the ten-faced one, while his twenty hands denote prowess and power. Ravana sees himself as the epitome of a complete human being,

without any ...more
Answered by LIPSIKA, 09 Mar '13 07:21 pm

 
  
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2.

Ravana....Ravana is depicted in art with up to ten heads, signifying his study of the Vedas and Shastras. His ten heads earned him the names Dashamukha, Dashagriva and Dashakantha . He is portrated as having twenty hands, signifying greed and never-ending want. Ravana was born to the Brahmin sage known as Vishrava. His mother was the Daitya princess Kaikesi. Kaikesi's father, Sumali, king of the Daityas, wished her to marry the most powerful being in the mortal world, so as to produce an exceptional heir.
Answered by anantharaman, 09 Mar '13 11:01 pm

 
  
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3.

Dasamukha does not mean having five heads on the right and another five on the left, with one neck in between. If it were so, think of the traffic jam and think what a calamity it would be if Ravana were to catch a cold. He would have to sneeze ten times in every round. Even to clear one nose is a terrible thing. What is meant here is that the five Gnanedriyas and the five Karmendriyas together constitute the Dasamukha. A totally extrovert man lives in the flesh, for the flesh, and by the flesh. It is the rule of the flesh. Such a man is a sensualist and a total extrovert. Materially he can become great as did Ravana who ruled over a prosperous land, Lanka, Compared to this land, Ayodhya was under-developed and village-like with perhaps bullock-carts plying on the roads. While in Lanka the country boasted of the Pushapaka Viman, the herals of the age of space travel. In fact Lanka was so advanced that even at 8 o'clock in the mornings women folk were found drunk! What a situation!! Eve ...more
Source: google search
Answered by anil garg, 09 Mar '13 07:33 pm

 
  
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4.

Knowledge ji
Answered by Dhuni, 09 Mar '13 07:24 pm

 
  
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Ravana....Ravana is depicted in art with up to ten heads, signifying his study of the Vedas and Shastras. His ten heads earned him the names Dashamukha, Dashagriva and Dashakantha . He is portrated as having twenty hands, signifying greed and never-ending want. Ravana was born to the Brahmin sage known as Vishrava. His mother was the Daitya princess Kaikesi. Kaikesi's father, Sumali, king of the Daityas, wished her to marry the most powerful being in the mortal world, so as to produce an exceptional heir.

Ravana an exemplary scholar. Under Vishrava's tutelage, Ravana mastered the Vedas and the holy books and also the arts and ways of Kshatriyas Ravana was also an excellent veena player and the sign of his flag had picture of veena on it. Ravana mastered vedas. Ravana kept senses under control. Ravana behaved well with human qualities. Ravana was a great devotee of God shiva.

He rejected the kings of the world, as they were less powerful than him. Kaikesi searched among the sages ...more
Answered by Quest, 09 Mar '13 07:22 pm

 
  
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6.

May be symbolism of his huge apetite?
Answered by up front, 09 Mar '13 07:19 pm

 
  
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