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Q.

What is hotter than sun?

Tags: sun
Asked by DUSHYANT THAKUR, 10 Jan '08 06:59 pm
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Answers (10)

 
1.

Just as blowing up a bubble leads to a pop, so can shrinking it. Rapidly collapsing bubbles have long been known to reach astonishing temperatures.
Now scientists have measured just how hot. And they're surprised.
"When bubbles in a liquid get compressed, the insides get hot - very hot," said Ken Suslick of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "The temperature we measured - about 20,000 degrees Kelvin [35,540 Fahrenheit] - is four times hotter than the surface of our Sun."
The bubbles are driven to form and collapse in a process called sonoluminescence, in which a liquid is blasted with high-frequency sound waves between 20 and 40 kilohertz (the highest pitch that humans can hear is about 20 kilohertz).
Inside a collapsing bubble, the temperature rises precipitously. Atoms and molecules collide with high-energy particles to create a fourth state of matter, called plasma. The process emits light.
But the heating is so brief and localized that it cannot be measured ...more
Answered by GOPI KUMAR, 10 Jan '08 07:30 pm

 
  
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2.

Lust
Answered by Richie, 10 Jan '08 07:04 pm

 
  
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3.

if some one hurt you in front of your girl friend or wife ..
Answered by prabhu, 12 Jan '08 09:20 am

 
  
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4.

nothing
Answered by ankita chakranarayan, 10 Jan '08 11:06 pm

 
  
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5.

Money is ur Pocket
Answered by himanshu sharma, 10 Jan '08 07:08 pm

 
  
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6.

Feelings
Answered by mukesh kumar, 10 Jan '08 07:06 pm

 
  
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7.

When bubbles in a liquid get compressed, the insides get hot very hot," said Ken Suslick of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "The temperature we measured about 20,000 degrees Kelvin [35,540 degrees Fahrenheit] is four times hotter than the surface of our Sun."
Answered by mandira sen, 11 Jan '08 11:03 am

 
  
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8.

Just as blowing up a bubble leads to a pop, so can shrinking it. Rapidly collapsing bubbles have long been known to reach astonishing temperatures.
Now scientists have measured just how hot. And they're surprised.
"When bubbles in a liquid get compressed, the insides get hot - very hot," said Ken Suslick of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "The temperature we measured - about 20,000 degrees Kelvin [35,540 Fahrenheit] - is four times hotter than the surface of our Sun."
The bubbles are driven to form and collapse in a process called sonoluminescence, in which a liquid is blasted with high-frequency sound waves between 20 and 40 kilohertz (the highest pitch that humans can hear is about 20 kilohertz).
Inside a collapsing bubble, the temperature rises precipitously. Atoms and molecules collide with high-energy particles to create a fourth state of matter, called plasma. The process emits light.
But the heating is so brief and localized that it cannot be measured ...more
Answered by victory, 10 Jan '08 08:40 pm

 
  
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9.

FEMALES
Answered by douglas raja, 10 Jan '08 07:13 pm

 
  
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10.

Our anger
Answered by Kanhaiya Marwal, 10 Jan '08 07:07 pm

 
  
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