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Q.

What is the nests size of the red wood ant?

Asked by jameel ahmed, 18 Aug '08 06:43 pm
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Answers (5)

 
1.

Red Wood Ants are usually considered by colony. One colony can consist of as many as half a million individuals, but is still generally considered one life form. The Red Wood Ant, "Formica rufa", often forms communes in the United States of a few to over twenty in dependant nests.Collectively the population of communes can reach several million workers and a few hundred Queens. On the continent the closely related F. polyctina is much more locally abundant, has many thousands of Queens in the same nests and their communes contain ants too numerous to count. Red Wood Ants are primarily found in Europe and Asia, with a distribution as far North as Scandinavia, south to Italy and west to Russia. Formica Sanguinea can also be found in Japan, China and Korea. Formica sanguinea, is by far one of the most intelligent insects alive today and typically enslaves smaller Formica species such as the Negro ant, Formica fusca and its relatives e.g. Formica cumnnicularia. F. sanguinea is ...more
Answered by always fresh, 20 Aug '08 11:28 am

 
  
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2.

Their nests are almost invisible when you do not look carefully. But the nests are in one line with the expanding wood ant super colony.The territory size of a colony ranges from a few hundred square metres to hundreds of square kilometers
Answered by PARTHA PATHAK, 20 Aug '08 05:19 pm

 
  
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3.

Depends on quantity of ants
Answered by satya, 28 Aug '08 11:43 am

 
  
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4.

I cannot able to post messages in your inbox, presently.
Answered by mohd yousuf, 19 Aug '08 04:27 pm

 
  
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5.

One of key factors responsible for the shape and size of a nest is subsidence
under its own weight, related to the mechanical strength of the construction. In large nests, this factor is more significant than the need for microclimatic regulation. In some cases, nest subsidence becomes irreversible and leads
to colony fragmentation. For nests with several domes, the critical factor is heat loss, which increases as nest deviates from rounded shape. The structural characteristics of a nest affect such aspects of the colony life as the size limit and fragmentation.
Answered by amit kumar, 18 Aug '08 06:47 pm

 
  
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