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Q.

Role of Atmatusti within Hindu Law?

Tags: law, role, hindu law
Asked by sudhakar kuruvada, 28 Mar '13 08:50 am
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Answers (6)

 
1.

The appointment of atmatusti as a fourth source can be understood by looking at the hierarchy of the sources.[6] The authority of each source is outlined along with the authoritative relationship the sources have on one another. Sruti, the first source, is superior and has more authority than Smriti and Acara. Smriti, the second source, in turn has authority over Acara, the third source. This is understandable in that the vedic texts are superior to tradition. Hence, it is only when the vedic texts do not provide the necessary dharma needed; will tradition or the secondary vedic texts be sought out. And, only when tradition does not provide the dharma on a specific topic should customary laws be looked into. Therefore, Manu appoints atmatusti as a last resort and fourth source of dharma for instances where the vedas, tradition, and customs all do not provide the necessary dharma or law.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 28 Mar '13 08:51 am

 
  
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2.

The authority of each source is outlined along with the authoritative relationship the sources have on one another. Sruti, the first source, is superior and has more authority than Smriti and Acara. Smriti, the second source, in turn has authority over Acara, the third source. This is understandable in that the vedic texts are superior to tradition. Hence, it is only when the vedic texts do not provide the necessary dharma needed; will tradition or the secondary vedic texts be sought out. And, only when tradition does not provide the dharma on a specific topic should customary laws be looked into. Therefore, Manu appoints atmatusti as a last resort and fourth source of dharma for instances where the vedas, tradition, and customs all do not provide the necessary dharma or law.
Answered by Quest, 28 Mar '13 12:52 pm

 
  
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3.

Atmatusti is somewhat close to conviction.
When something is not addressed in Dharmasastra or have precedences, then one can by conviction. It has last place b'coz of limitations of individuals about perceptions, rationale, understanding of the situations, etc.
Answered by MAdhavan Avadhany, 28 Mar '13 09:40 am

 
  
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4.

The appointment of atmatusti as a fourth source can be understood by looking at the hierarchy of the sources.[6] The authority of each source is outlined along with the authoritative relationship the sources have on one another. Sruti, the first source, is superior and has more authority than Smriti and Acara. Smriti, the second source, in turn has authority over Acara, the third source. This is understandable in that the vedic texts are superior to tradition. Hence, it is only when the vedic texts do not provide the necessary dharma needed; will tradition or the secondary vedic texts be sought out. And, only when tradition does not provide the dharma on a specific topic should customary laws be looked into. Therefore, Manu appoints atmatusti as a last resort and fourth source of dharma for instances where the vedas, tradition, and customs all do not provide the necessary dharma or law.
Answered by sanjeev, 28 Mar '13 09:36 am

 
  
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5.

The appointment of atmatusti as a fourth source can be understood by looking at the hierarchy of the sources.[6] The authority of each source is outlined along with the authoritative relationship the sources have on one another. Sruti, the first source, is superior and has more authority than Smriti and Acara. Smriti, the second source, in turn has authority over Acara, the third source. This is understandable in that the vedic texts are superior to tradition. Hence, it is only when the vedic texts do not provide the necessary dharma needed; will tradition or the secondary vedic texts be sought out. And, only when tradition does not provide the dharma on a specific topic should customary laws be looked into. Therefore, Manu appoints atmatusti as a last resort and fourth source of dharma for instances where the vedas, tradition, and customs all do not provide the necessary dharma or law.
Answered by Piaa, 28 Mar '13 09:35 am

 
  
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6.

The appointment of atmatusti as a fourth source can be understood by looking at the hierarchy of the sources.[6] The authority of each source is outlined along with the authoritative relationship the sources have on one another. Sruti, the first source, is superior and has more authority than Smriti and Acara. Smriti, the second source, in turn has authority over Acara, the third source. This is understandable in that the vedic texts are superior to tradition. Hence, it is only when the vedic texts do not provide the necessary dharma needed; will tradition or the secondary vedic texts be sought out. And, only when tradition does not provide the dharma on a specific topic should customary laws be looked into. Therefore, Manu appoints atmatusti as a last resort and fourth source of dharma for instances where the vedas, tradition, and customs all do not provide the necessary dharma or law.
Answered by iqbal seth, 28 Mar '13 09:26 am

 
  
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