Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

Can we not do something to generate power from the sea water?

Asked by vandana iyer, 27 Jul '08 09:44 pm
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (10)

 
1.

Yes, It can be done but problems are two-
making it non-alkaline : it is allready being done in middle east countries and the process is known as "desalination'.....problem is it itself requires lots of energy :)
two, how to propell turbine?
but it can be done, inmy opinion. only thing it needs lots of initial investment, may be biilions of dollers
Answered by Tough, 27 Jul '08 10:18 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

You proposed sea water because its quantity is more, and something can be found out, there would be inexhaustible source of energy. Only tidal energy can be
converted but using sea water to generate current still belongs to science fiction
category.
Answered by sitapati rao, 28 Jul '08 05:14 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

There are technologies to produce electric power from sea, but it is costly . May be some day it will viable.
Answered by talkoftown, 27 Jul '08 11:33 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

Yes, three fourths of the land is of water
Answered by puranam mahalaxmi, 27 Jul '08 10:13 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
5.

Problem is to make that water stream line and put at such height to make the power generated also it contains salt hence job is a bit tough
Answered by SHASHIBHUSHAN, 27 Jul '08 09:46 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
6.

Yes we can
Answered by Venkatraman Iyer, 27 Jul '08 09:45 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
7.

IIT Madras has already made out a project.
Also I think in Japan or somewhere they have tried it, but seems to be expensive.
Answered by Sundar Rajan, 01 Aug '08 09:32 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
8.

Fro a News item: Possible Energy Source: Burning Seawater
Cancer Researcher Discovers Hydrogen From Salt Water Can Be "Burned" By Radio Frequencies

An Erie cancer researcher has found a way to burn salt water, a novel invention that is being touted by one chemist as the "most remarkable" water science discovery in a century.

John Kanzius happened upon the discovery accidentally when he tried to desalinate seawater with a radio-frequency generator he developed to treat cancer. He discovered that as long as the salt water was exposed to the radio frequencies it would burn.

The discovery has scientists excited by the prospect of using salt water, the most abundant resource on earth, as a fuel.

Rustum Roy, a Penn State University chemist, has held demonstrations at his State College lab to confirm his own observations.

The radio frequencies act to weaken the bonds between the elements that make up salt water, releasing the hydrogen, Roy said. On ...more
Answered by Jack Johnson, 28 Jul '08 08:25 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
9.

Yes it can be done, but the Question is Economy?
Is it economical?
No, generating power from sea-water which is at lower level,
will need to be lifted up to a minimum of 60 feets and then dropped on the turbine blades to give movement to Rotar .
Lifting of water to that height will need more energy power than the earned energy power.
So, the very basis of Power generation is lost.
Answered by Aakash, 28 Jul '08 10:51 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
10.

Tidal energy is indeed possible but very costly. Also the environmental impact of the same is high and therefore it has not picked up on a mass scale. The largest implementation of tidal power is in France. India also has an experimental ground of the same close to Chennai
Answered by Saj Sierra, 28 Jul '08 09:10 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining

Related Answer

Q.
A

Calyampudi Radhakrishna Rao FRS (born September 10, 1920) is a world-renowned Indian statistician and currently professor emeritus at Penn State Unive..more

Answered by Stone Heart