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Q.

Paani ka kaun sa rang hota hai?

Tags: kaun sa, paani ka, rang hota
Asked by Avinash Sharma, 03 Sep '12 12:02 am
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Answers (2)

1.

We see water in a variety of ways. It may be colored by particles, the presence of bacteria, or by reflecting the world above its surface. Ice and snow may reveal a vivid internal blue. Water itself has an intrinsic blue color that is a result of its molecular structure and its behavior
There are other factors that can affect our perception of the color of water. For example, particles in water can absorb light, scatter light, and reflect light. Light may be absorbed by particles and solutes, as evidenced by the darker color of tea or coffee. Green algae in rivers and streams often lends a blue-green color to the water. Some mountain lakes and streams that contain finely ground rock, such as glacial flour, are turquoise. The surface of water can also reflect skylight.
It is often easier to appreciate waters intrinsic blue when looking at large bodies of water, such as lakes, seas and oceans, when we are able to observe how sunlight changes color as it travels through a significant de ...more
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Answered by anil garg, 03 Sep '12 09:36 pm

 
  
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2.

The color of water is a subject of both scientific study and popular misconception. Pure water has a light blue color which becomes a deeper blue as the thickness of the observed sample increases. The blue color is caused by selective absorption and scattering of the light spectrum. Impurities dissolved or suspended in water may give water different colored appearances.

Water owes its intrinsic blueness to selective absorption in the red part of its visible spectrum. The absorbed photons promote transitions to high overtone and combination states of the nuclear motions of the molecule, i.e. to highly excited vibrations. To our knowledge the intrinsic blueness of water is the only example from nature in which color originates from vibrational transitions. Other materials owe their colors to the interaction of visible light with the electrons of the substances. Their colors may originate from resonant interactions between photons and matter such as absorption, emission, and selective ...more
Answered by jakir hussain, 03 Sep '12 12:06 am

 
  
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