Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

Other than Hindu religion, in which other religions Animals are considered to be SACRED ??

Tags: relationships, hindu religion, religion
Asked by Rose, 21 May '12 02:15 pm
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (4)

1.

READ HINDU SCRIPTURES , ANIMALS WERE SLAUGHTERED FOR FOOD BY RISHIS , SAINTS ,EVEN COW SACRIFICE
It is interesting to note that the cow used to be slaughtered by the ancient

Hindus to enjoy its beef, entertain the guests and offer it as sacrifice to

their nude deities.(But now Cow eating punishable by Hindu Law ,passed against

beef eating muslims,christians and majority Low castes)

...more
Answered by hemant mehta, 21 May '12 02:19 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (3)
Not Useful
 (1)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

Jainism, in the name of festival and some superstitious belief many Hindus why the slaughter the animals?
Answered by jameel ahmed, 21 May '12 02:19 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (2)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

Buddhism, & sikhism .........
Answered by pradeep mishra, 21 May '12 02:19 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

He origins of animal worship have been the subject of many theories. The classical author Diodorus explained the origin of animal-worship by recalling the myth in which the gods, supposedly threatened by giants, hid under the guise of animals. The people then naturally began to worship the animals that their gods had disguised themselves as and continued this act even after the gods returned to their normal state (Lubbock, 2005, p. 252). In 1906, Weissenborn suggested that animal worship resulted from mans natural curiosity. Primitive man would observe an animal that had a unique trait and the inexplicability of this trait would appeal to mans curiosity (Weissenborn, 1906b, p. 282). Wonder resulted from primitive mans observations of this distinctive trait and this wonder eventually induced adoration. Thus, primitive man worshipped animals that had inimitable traits (Weissenborn, 1906b, p. 282). Lubbock put forward a more recent view. Lubbock proposed that animal-worship originated fro ...more
Source: google search
Answered by anil garg, 23 May '12 01:26 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining

Related Answer

Q.
A

Possibly he's confused......Hinduism is not just a religion!!! Its the very ways of life.......so even if one claims he's changed his religion from Hi..more