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Q.

"Auld Lang syne"
Whats special about this song?Tell me abt its origin.

Tags: abt, whats, origin
Asked by prashant sharma, 23 Apr '08 07:08 pm
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Answers (5)

1.

'Auld Lang Syne' is the Scottish phrase for old long since or long long ago. It is a poem by Robert Burns, Scotland's national poet set to the tune of traditional Scottish folk song. Burns wrote it in the year 1788. It was also used in poems written by Robert Ayton, Allan Ramsay and James Watson, as well as in older folk songs. It is usually sung at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Day (January 1) every year. New Year's Day in Scotland is called Hogmanay.
Answered by Akshay Kalbag, 23 Apr '08 07:18 pm

 
  
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2.

The populous belief is that Rabbie Burns wrote "Auld Lang Syne" and this has been the subject of much debate. In short, it is apparent that Burns "restored" the piece based on fragments of an old ballad dating from before Burns time. In fact, it is concluded that Burns probably only added a few verses of to the song. The most compelling evidence is demonstrated in a letter from Burns to Mrs Agnes Dunlop in which he comments..

"Light be the turf on breast of the heaven-inspired poet who composed this glorious fragment! There is more of the fire of native genius in it than in half a dozen of modern English Bacchanalians"
In this statement, Robert Burns was confirming that someone else had written this marvellous piece, albeit that the original words had been lost in the mists of time. His reference to "Light be the turf" means..the turf lying upon the writers grave. The "glorious fragment" confirms that Burns had taken t ...more
Answered by Janis, 23 Apr '08 08:36 pm

 
  
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3.

" Auld Lang Syne" was played by Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians as a New Year's Eve song for the first time on December 31, 1929. Though it was played as the band's theme song for years, and it had even occasionally been sung on New Year's Eve, this was the first time that Lombardo's group played it at the Hotel Roosevelt Grill in New York City to usher in the new year. The annual tradition continued when the party moved to the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel (1959-1976) and the song still kicks off the Times Square celebration every New Year's Eve.
Answered by Sanat Kumar, 23 Apr '08 07:11 pm

 
  
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4.

This is an old Scotish tune which literally means "old long ago," or simply, the good old days. It is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English-speaking country in the world to bring in the new year. Partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700s, it was first published in 1796 after his death.
Answered by Manisha Mehra, 23 Apr '08 07:14 pm

 
  
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5.

Wht is this
Answered by rajeev singh, 23 Apr '08 07:11 pm

 
  
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