Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

Will Thorium replace Uranium as the nuclear fuel in the near future? Your views?

Asked by Good Citizen, 21 Feb '10 07:23 pm
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (5)

1.

Although thorium technology offers substantial advantages, the legacy uranium technology has become deeply entrenched over the course of six decades with corporations and bureaucracies devoted to its advancement. There are, however, a potent set of potential game changers, as leaders in the U.S. Congress and the Department of Defense now recognize it is not in its national interests to have strategic materials like nuclear fuels and REE under the control of foreign governments.

For example, one Congressional bill, H.R. 1534, would direct the Department of Defense to investigate the possible use of thorium in naval reactors. Another, Senate Bill S.3680, would amend the 1954 Atomic Energy Act to provide for thorium nuclear fuel development. In fact, when Senator Orrin Hatch introduced the bill, he said, "Our nation has focused mostly on mixed oxide nuclear fuel cycles, and our regulatory structure reflects that. With the growing interest in thorium nuclear power ... it's time we made ...more
Answered by anantharaman, 21 Feb '10 07:33 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

Thorium cannot be used directly as nuclear fuel but forms an important link in the fuel cycle since thorium can be converted into uranium 233 by being put in a uranium fueled reactor. Our Fast Breeder Reactor program and the Advanced Heavy Reactor program are designed to use the vast thorium reserves in our country.
Answered by Venkateswaraswamy Swarna, 23 Feb '10 06:54 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

Any thing may happen.This possibility can not be ruled out.
Answered by Damodar Biswal, 21 Feb '10 07:28 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

Yes, all rare materials are the substitute of one another......only few countries are misguiding everyone.....as we read all rare meterials are carring allmost same characterstic.......the lack of confidence mislead to some extent......
Answered by pradeep mishra, 21 Feb '10 07:26 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
5.

Yes..............
Answered by Sundeep, 23 Feb '10 09:05 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining

Related Answer

Q.
A

Once I visit ONGC, brillant scientist was their, Indian have good potential salary are as good as out of India. may resource are limited but it does't..more

Answered by Jeet