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Q.

Who invented game of snake and ladder and when?

Tags: sports, game, science
Asked by Ramesh Agarwal, 31 Oct '09 08:05 pm
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Answers (5)

1.

Snakes and Ladders1 is a very simple childhood racing board game. However its origins are reported to date back to the 2nd Century BC. It was played in India, and known by the name Moksha-patamu. In a time of great morality, it was originally a board game used by religious leaders to teach children about the difference between good and evil - climbing up the ladders representing good, and sliding down the snakes representing evil. The western world discovered Moksha-patamu during England's period of colonial expansion, and adopted it.
In around 1890 the religious and moral aspects were removed, and it was repackaged and sold in England as a children's racing board game.
Answered by Shikha Aggarwal, 31 Oct '09 08:38 pm

 
  
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2.

The Indians invented it but I do not know when. The Victorians took the game back to England in 1892 and it because popular there.
Answered by Janis, 31 Oct '09 08:26 pm

 
  
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3.

The board game, today called Snakes and Ladders, originated in ancient India, where it was known with the name Mokshapat or Moksha Patamu. It's not exactly known when or who invented it, though it's believed the game was played at a time as early as 2nd century BC. According to some historians, the game was invented by Saint Gyandev in the 13th century AD. Originally, the game was used as a part of moral instruction to children. The squares in which ladders start were each supposed to stand for a virtue, and those housing the head of a snake were supposed to stand for an evil. The snakes outnumbered the ladders in the original Hindu game. The game was transported to England by the colonial rulers in the latter part of the 19th century, with some modifications. The modified game was named Snakes and Ladders and stripped of its moral and religious aspects and the number of ladders and snakes were equalized. In 1943, the game was introduced in the US under the name Chutes and Ladders.

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Answered by victory, 01 Nov '09 05:55 am

 
  
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4.

Snakes and Ladders originated in India as a game based on morality called Vaikuntapaali or Paramapada Sopanam (the ladder to salvation). This game made its way to England, and was eventually introduced in the United States of America by game pioneer Milton Bradley in 1943.

The game was played widely in ancient India by the name of Moksha Patamu, the earliest known Jain version Gyanbazi dating back to 16th century. The game was called "Leela" - and reflected the Hinduism consciousness around everyday life. Impressed by the ideals behind the game, a newer version was introduced in Victorian England in 1892, possibly by John Jacques of Jacques of London.

Moksha Patamu was perhaps invented by Hindu spiritual teachers to teach children about the effects of good deeds as opposed to bad deeds. The ladders represented virtues such as generosity, faith, humility, etc., and the snakes represented vices such as lust, anger, murder, theft, etc. The moral of the game was that a person can at ...more
Answered by Jack Johnson, 01 Nov '09 03:29 am

 
  
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5.

A perosn from India, definately
Answered by Anand Agarwal, 31 Oct '09 08:14 pm

 
  
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