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Q.

Many articles written with 'sic' against the statement. What does 'sic' mean?

About: PM hints at liberalisation of FDI regime

Asked by Venkatesan HARIHARAN, 03 Apr '13 03:23 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

The Latin adverb sic ("thus"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written") added immediately after a quoted word or phrase (or a longer piece of text), indicates that the quotation has been transcribed exactly as found in the original source, complete with any erroneous spelling or other nonstandard presentation. The usual purpose is to inform the reader that any errors or apparent errors in the transcribed material do not arise from transcription errors, and the errors have been repeated intentionally, i.e., that they are reproduced exactly as set down by the original writer or printer. It may also be used as a form of ridicule or as a humorous comment, drawing attention to the original writer's spelling mistakes or emphasizing his or her erroneous logic. Sic is generally placed inside square brackets, or in parentheses (round brackets), and traditionally in italic, as is customary when printing a foreign word.
Answered by vedprakash sharma, 04 Apr '13 12:22 am

 
  
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2.

"Sic" is Latin for "thus.
Answered by Quest, 03 Apr '13 08:29 pm

 
  
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3.

Sic means sick i think or sincronisation
Answered by rainbow girl, 03 Apr '13 05:18 pm

 
  
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4.

"Sic" is Latin for "thus." Yeah, that didn't clear it up for us either. But apparently, since the 1880s, writers have used [sic] next to quotations that include errors.
Answered by Psycho, 03 Apr '13 03:25 pm

 
  
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