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Q.

Is there any archeological evidence that proverbial River Saraswati did exist ? If yes, what is it?

Tags: saraswati, river saraswati, archeological evidence
Asked by Manoj, 16 Dec '09 03:48 pm
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Answers (3)

1.

The disappearance of the Saraswati river. In the 'rivers hymn' of the Rig Veda, The Rig Veda correctly notes all the prevalent rivers of Western and Central South Asia, going from an 'east to west' chronology. In between naming Sutlej and Indus, the Rig Veda mentions 'Saraswati'. Indeed, Saraswati is the main river of venerance in the Rig Veda- its 'glory and auspiciousness' far outstrips that of the Ganges and the Indus. But throughout written history, Saraswati is described as a 'mythic' or 'disappeared' river- this is true from any and all reference to the Saraswati we find in the 500 BCE to present day references.

Recent geological developments in the subcontinent have provided a possible answer to the puzzle.As my picture here shows, there exists a current river, the Ghaggar-Hakra, that originates in the himalayas but quickly disappears in the Cholistan desert(Pakistan). Satellite imagery has shown that there is a dry river bed that extends from the point of Ghaggar-Hakra's dis ...more
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 16 Dec '09 03:56 pm

 
  
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2.

I too agree with what had been told by Saranathanji and there are famous archaeological site alo9ng saraswati banks, the most famous of which is the pre harappan archaeological site of Kalibangan
Answered by ranjith nambiar, 26 Dec '09 01:35 pm

 
  
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3.

Most scholars agree that at least some of the references to the Sarasvati in the Rigveda refer to the Ghaggar-Hakra River, while the Helmand River is often quoted as the locus of the early Rigvedic river. Whether such a transfer of the name has taken place, either from the Helmand to the Ghaggar-Hakra, or conversely from the Ghaggar-Hakra to the Helmand, is a matter of dispute.
Answered by dhanendra kumar jain, 16 Dec '09 03:51 pm

 
  
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