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Q.

How are popes elected and how did this tradition start ?

Tags: relationships, arts & culture, religion & spirituality
Asked by shaakal, 14 Mar '13 11:24 am
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Answers (6)

 
1.

When the pope dies, the cardinals are summoned to Rome by the dean of the college of cardinals for the conclave that will elect the new pope.

The word conclave designates the place in a locked section of the Vatican where the cardinals remain until a new pope is elected. It is also used to designate the actual gathering of the cardinals.

Before the conclave: The cardinals may discuss the upcoming election with one another. The conclave begins fifteen to twenty days after the pope's death.

The actual conclave: After the celebration of Mass, the cardinal dean presides over the preliminary sessions, where procedures regulated by canon law are clarified. Then all others are dismissed and the cardinals are sealed in the Sistine Chapel where the voting takes place, every morning and afternoon.

Until recently a two-thirds majority plus one was required for election. After his election Pope John Paul II changed this. Now if there is no conclusive vote after thirty ballots, an absol ...more
Answered by Psycho, 14 Mar '13 11:32 am

 
  
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2.

The pope was originally chosen by those senior clergymen resident in and near Rome. In 1059 the electorate was restricted to the Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church, and the individual votes of all Cardinal Electors were made equal in 1179. Pope Urban VI, elected 1378, was the last pope who was not already a cardinal at his election. Canon law requires that if a layman or non-bishop is elected, he receives episcopal consecration from the Dean of the College of Cardinals before assuming the Pontificate. Under present canon law, the pope is elected by the cardinal electors, comprising those cardinals who are under the age of 80.
Answered by Quest, 14 Mar '13 11:46 am

 
  
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3.

Calling the Conclave. After the death, funeral and burial of a pope, the cardinal camerlengo, the man who runs the Vatican between the death of one pope and the election of another, calls a conclave-a meeting of all eligible cardinals for the purpose of electing a successor to the throne of St. Peter. The Sacred College of Cardinals consists of 120 men all under the age of 80. All members of the College are summoned to Rome. Any member who fails to appear is excommunicated, unless he has a good excuse for not attending, such as imprisonment, serious illness or death.

Know the Candidates. Popes are usually picked from the membership of the College. The most likely candidates are referred to as "papabile." It's been said that "Any man who walks into the conclave a pope will leave as a cardinal," but this saying isn't necessarily true. Cardinal Ratzinger, for instance, was high on the list of papabile, and he in fact was elected as pope in 2005. Vatican watchers often speculate that th ...more
Source: partha pathak sahib.
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 14 Mar '13 11:27 am

 
  
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4.

A papal conclave is a meeting of the College of Cardinals convened to elect a new Bishop of Rome, also known as the Pope. The pope is considered by Roman Catholics to be the apostolic successor of Saint Peter and earthly head of the Roman Catholic Church.[1] The conclave has been the procedure for choosing the pope for more than half of the time the church has been in existence, and is the oldest ongoing method for choosing the leader of an institution.[2]

A history of political interference in papal selection and consequently long vacancies between popes, culminating in the interregnum of 12681271, prompted Pope Gregory X to decree during the Second Council of Lyons in 1274 that the cardinal electors should be locked in seclusion cum clave (Latin for "with a key") and not permitted to leave until a new Bishop of Rome had been elected.[3] Conclaves are now held in the Sistine Chapel of the Apostolic Palace.[4]

Since the Apostolic Age, the Bishop of Rome, like other bishops, was ...more
Answered by iqbal seth, 14 Mar '13 11:26 am

 
  
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5.

Interesting BA
Answered by anil garg, 05 May '13 03:37 pm

 
  
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6.

Check wiki for details
Answered by conviction, 09 Apr '13 08:59 pm

 
  
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