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Q.

Why would no pulses be observed from a rotating neutron star if its magnetic axis and spin axis were aligned?

Tags: bollywood & movies, magnetic axis, rotating neutron
Asked by jameel ahmed, 19 Oct '10 03:21 pm
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Answers (1)

 
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Neutron star is a type of remnant that can result from the gravitational collapse of a massive star during a Type II, Type Ib or Type Ic supernova event. Such stars are composed almost entirely of neutrons, which are subatomic particles without electrical charge and a slightly larger mass than protons. Neutron stars are very hot and are supported against further collapse because of the Pauli exclusion principle. This principle states that no two neutrons (or any other fermionic particle) can occupy the same place and quantum state simultaneously.

A typical neutron star has a mass between 1.35 and about 2.1 solar masses, with a corresponding radius of about 12 km if the Akmal-Pandharipande-Ravenhall (APR) Equation of state (EOS) is used.[1][2] In contrast, the Sun's radius is about 60,000 times that. Neutron stars have overall densities predicted by the APR EOS of 3.71017 to 5.91017 kg/m3 (2.61014 to 4.11014 times the density of the Sun),[3] which compares with the approximate densit ...more
Answered by mohd yousuf, 19 Oct '10 03:28 pm

 
  
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