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Q.

Jai shri ram who started langer and what was reason behind it?

Tags: relationships, reason, shri
Asked by Ramesh Agarwal, 31 Jul '13 09:10 pm
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Answers (4)

 
1.

Started by the first Sikh Guru, Guru Nanak. It was designed to uphold the principle of equality between all people regardless of religion, caste, colour, creed, age, gender or social status, a revolutionary concept in the caste-ordered society of 16th-century India where Sikhism began. In addition to the ideals of equality, the tradition of langar expresses the ethics of sharing, community, inclusiveness and oneness of all humankind
Answered by PARTHA PATHAK, 31 Jul '13 09:13 pm

 
  
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2.

Its for you and the BJP to get free food
Answered by Ghost Singh, 31 Jul '13 09:22 pm

 
  
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3.

Guru nanak....to establish unity and intigrity....
Answered by vijay, 03 Aug '13 04:15 pm

 
  
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4.

He term used in the Sikh religion or in Punjab in general for common kitchen/canteen where food is served in a Gurdwara to all the visitors (without distinction of background) for free. At the langar, only vegetarian food is served, to ensure that all people, regardless of their dietary restrictions, can eat as equals. Langar is open to Sikhs and non-Sikhs alike.

The institution of the Sikh langar, or free kitchen, was started by the first Sikh Guru, Guru Nanak. It was designed to uphold the principle of equality between all people regardless of religion, caste, colour, creed, age, gender or social status, a revolutionary concept in the caste-ordered society of 16th-century India where Sikhism began. In addition to the ideals of equality, the tradition of langar expresses the ethics of sharing, community, inclusiveness and oneness of all humankind. "...the Light of God is in all hearts."[6]

After the Second Sikh Guru, the institution of langar seems to have changed,[7] somewhat, ...more
Answered by Quest, 01 Aug '13 01:02 pm

 
  
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