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Q.

Sex is a taboo topic in India even today when there is so much of technological advancement , My question is how and why is the Govt keeping alive the temple of Khajuraho , is it not a hypocracy to what we say of the so called "Customs and Traditions of India" ? Is the temple not a pornographic temple ?

Asked by KishoranandVittalMangalore, 13 Nov '08 12:57 pm
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Answers (62)

1.

Despite the technological advancement and so much available knowledge there is a growing need for sex education even today. Why it should be so? The sex in India is not a taboo because only in India people worship Shiva Lingam and Yoni. The practice began so that people may develop respect towards sex. One should not view sex as an object of pleasure, and one should not view women only as an object of sex. Khajuraho temples too were built by keeping this objective in mind. May be at one time the people's interest in sex was being depleted. They were drawn more and more towards Sanyas. This would have led human race towards extinction. These temples were therefore built not to arouse a prurient interest but a healthy attitude towards sex. People should know that sex is only for procreation and for propagation of life. It should not be abused and misused. Temple of Khajuraho should be seen as an art form and not merely as pornography.
Answered by Jack Johnson, 16 Nov '08 09:47 am

 
  
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2.

Hypocrisy at its best. The temples of Khajuraho are a cool manifstation of artistics tastes emanating from daily LIFE occurences. And sex is also very humane. its the way how ya and me were born. Wonder why Indian society loves to closet it and abuse it to the maxim
Answered by Saj Sierra, 15 Nov '08 11:16 am

 
  
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3.

Dear Mr.Kishor , honestly saying your questions has gained many good answers ... I find harldy anythng left that can be added .

ONE THING I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT ......... WHILE YOU ROLL YOUR EYES ON THOSE STONE ARTS ... DONT YOU REALLY THINK ABOUT THOSE SCULPTORS ? I DONT KNOW ANY TRADITION ,AND CUSTOMS MEANS WHEN EVER I SEE THESE I JUST IMAGINE HOW THEY MIGHT HAVE WORKED DAY AND NIGHT , HOW THEY MIGHT HAVE BROUGHT MATERIALS INSIDE WITHOUT HAVING PROPER INFRASTRUCTRE FACILITIES ..... I TOO AM A MAN MADE OF FLESH AND BLOOD ...HAVE SAME FEELINGS LIKE OTHER MEN BUT I REALLY NEVER FELT ANYTHING SEXUALLY ROUSING .. INFACT GOVT SHOULD SPEND MONEY TO MAINTAIN SUCH CULTUARAL HERITAGE , THEY SHOULD PROVIDE TIGHT SECIRITY SO THAT NO OTHER COUNTRY CAN FOLLOW THE METHOD OF ART .
Answered by joyesh chakraborty, 14 Nov '08 03:23 pm

 
  
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4.

There is a world of difference between conserving an ancient heritage building of architectural importance, representing as it does a past culture and throwing sex and pornographic images in everyone's face! As for saying sex is a taboo topic in India - what nonsense - questions on this forum everyday illustrate the obsession with the subject. The population explosion illustrates the practice of the subject. Frankly I think India has gone too far the other way - rather than just accepting sex as a normal and natural part of life, the obsession with it is twisting it into something unnatural and perverted. There is a place for everything and everything in its place. Why can't folk just accept artistic architectural heritage for it's own sake rather than trying to sully it with the implication that the Government is promoting pornography! I only hope the Government will have the wisdom and will to preserve and conserve so many other buildings of national importance in India whic ...more
Answered by Janis, 14 Nov '08 05:52 pm

 
  
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5.

No Kishore. It is like knowing all and not displaying anything i.e. we know that we are naked underneath our clothes but we do not put off our clothes and have regards before our elders. Similarly, we have a very rich culture showing spiritual ways through sex but we do not expose it like western countries and stick to our culture of being covered and maintaining that wall of shame which is an integral part of our society. Tradition and culture goes on for centuries and takes a very long time for any change to occur.
Answered by nagendra kumar pathak, 18 Nov '08 01:05 pm

 
  
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6.

Dear Kishoranandvittalji, I am in same view like mr. joyeshji who has replied below already. regards Cyrus
Answered by cyrus irani, 17 Nov '08 02:29 pm

 
  
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7.

Visiting Khajuraho or Konark or many other temples where erotic art is displayed is different from the open sexuality of western culture. And sex is not so much a taboo topic if you see the questions and answers here and many other question and answer forums.

Pornography is different from erotica. Write to me separately if you want to discuss.

Blessings.

Swamy
Answered by Venkateswaraswamy Swarna, 25 Nov '08 06:39 pm

 
  
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Some where down the line fron the ancient times to where we are today, the very topic of sex has become taboo, to be talked about in hush hush tones and with a pretension in many a household that it doesn't exist at all. Indian society as it evolved was not so 'traditionalist' at all, as we define the term today where it has come to be misinterpreted. If you have done a study of the ancient or middle ages period of India, you would find that women were much more liberated in every sense. Look at the traditional dresses which were the accepted norm those days. No one called it 'exposure'. If we define them by today's standards, they are more enticing, more bold and more of a style statement than even the best fashion designer can come up. Why it sustained for such a long period of time is for the very reason that '"the eyes that looked at them were not so squinted or perverted as it may be". TOday if a woman was to dress in the same way, it would be sneered at, leered at and ogled upon. ...more
Answered by Omega, 16 Nov '08 10:58 pm

 
  
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9.

It is a subtle, ingenious, clever, inventive, imaginative and constructive way of teaching the young about the sexual life of marrige.==========================================

The Khajuraho temples do not contain sexual or ****** art inside the temple or near the deities; however, some external carvings bear ****** art. Also, some of the temples that have two layers of walls have small ****** carvings on the outside of the inner wall. There are many interpretations of the ****** carvings. They portray that, for seeing the deity, one must leave his or her sexual desires outside the temple. They also show that divinity, such as the deities of the temples, is pure like the atman, which is not affected by sexual desires and other characteristics of the physical body. It has been suggested that these suggest tantric sexual practices. Meanwhile, the external curvature and carvings of the temples depict humans, human bodies, and the changes that occur in human bodies, as well as facts of ...more
Answered by ankit shivam, 17 Nov '08 01:37 pm

 
  
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10.

Govt. is keeping alive the TEMPLE only for its art .n it shud be kept alive always.any art is to admire only .it depends on individual how n frm which angle the person observes.
Answered by chitrasahgal, 13 Nov '08 06:57 pm

 
  
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