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Q.

What is the story behind the Loch Ness monster. When was it first seen, and is there any strong evidence to suggest that the first sighting was real or just folklore?

Asked by Jack Johnson, 18 May '08 09:34 am
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Answers (2)

 
1.

Sorry for this long winded answer Mr. Johnson. But I couldnt resist sharing it with you as I found it to be quite genuine. Happy reading:

Reports of a mysterious creature in Loch Ness, Scotland go back to around the 6th century, but the legend of the Loch Ness Monster, nicknamed "Nessie," got a boost in the early 1930s with several reported sightings and alleged photographic evidence. In 1934 an English surgeon named R. Kenneth Wilson took what is perhaps the most famous photo (sometimes called the "Surgeon's Photo"), supposedly showing a head and neck above the water and indicating a very large creature. Since then there have been thousands of reported sightings and countless attempts to find and photograph the "monster," despite repeated assurances by scientists that no such creature exists. Loch Ness is deep, dark and murky, about 24 miles long and 700 feet deep in places, which has helped keep the legend alive. In the 1970s Robert Rines, a la ...more
Answered by gem mina, 18 May '08 09:40 am

 
  
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2.

Loch Ness is part of the Great Glen, an enormous fissure in the earth that just about splits Scotland into two. There are a series of lochs, rivers and canals that link the Atlantic with the North Sea. this is the most eastern of these.
It is the largest freshwater lake in the Britain. It is twenty four miles long and a maximum of one and a half miles wide. Its maximum depth is around 750 feet and its average depth 450 feet. Because the waters are very cold, and also very cloudy it is difficult to see underwater more than a few feet. So there is a lot of murky water in which The Loch Ness Monster (Nessie) could hide.
The legend was said to have started with an account of Saint Columba, in 565 A.D rescuing a swimmer from a lake creature. From then on stories of such a creature emerged periodically, but little is actually recorded until the 20th century.
It was only after 1933, when a new road was built along the lake shore and people were first able to visit the area in large num ...more
Answered by Janis, 18 May '08 01:47 pm

 
  
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