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Q.

Identify the works of Mashallah ?

Tags: careers, health, identify
Asked by truth exposed, 30 Nov '12 10:51 pm
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Answers (3)

 
1.

M Allh is an Arabic phrase that expresses appreciation, joy, praise or thankfulness for an event or person that was just mentioned. Towards this, it is used as an expression of respect, while at the same time serving as a reminder that all accomplishments are so achieved by the will of Allah. It is generally said upon hearing good news. People may use this phrase to protect themselves from jealousy, catching the evil eye, or jinxing. The phrase is also used frequently by Christians in the Arab World and other Islamic countries.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 30 Nov '12 10:56 pm

 
  
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2.

Masha'allah ibn Athar was an eighth-century Persian Jewish astrologer and astronomer from the city of Basra (now located in modern day Iraq) who became the leading astrologer of the late 8th century.
Answered by iqbal seth, 01 Dec '12 07:32 am

 
  
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Mashallah wrote works on Astral sympathies, otherwise known as astrology. Of his over 20 works, few remain. Only one of his writings is still extant in its original Arabic,[4] but there are many medieval Latin,[5] Byzantine Greek[6][7] and Hebrew translations. One of his most popular books in the Middle Ages was the De scientia motus orbis, translated by Gherardo Cremonese (Gerard of Cremona). Mashallah's treatise De mercibus (On Prices) is the oldest extant scientific work in Arabic.[8]

He also wrote treatises on Astrolabes (p 10). The De scientia motus orbis is probably the treatise called in Arabic "the twenty-seventh," printed in Nuremberg in 1501, 1549. The second edition, De elementis et orbibus coelestibus, contains 27 chapters. The De compositione et utilitate astrolabii was included in Gregor Reisch: Margarita phylosophica (ed. pr., Freiburg, 1503; Suter says the text is included in the Basel edition of 1583). Other astronomical and astrological writings are quoted by Suter ...more
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Answered by anil garg, 01 Dec '12 01:21 am

 
  
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