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Q.

Identify the Contributions of Ibn Batuta ?

Tags: money, identify, ibn
Asked by truth exposed, 14 Oct '12 01:22 pm
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Answers (2)

1.

Ibn Battuta (February 25, 13041368 or 1369), was a Berber Muslim Moroccan explorer, known for his extensive travels, accounts of which were published in the Rihla (lit. "Journey"). Over a period of thirty years, he visited most of the known Islamic world as well as many non-Muslim lands; his journeys including trips to North Africa, the Horn of Africa, West Africa, Southern Europe and Eastern Europe in the West, and to the Middle East, South Asia, Central Asia, Southeast Asia and China in the East, a distance surpassing threefold his near-contemporary Marco Polo. Ibn Battuta is considered one of the greatest travellers of all time.[2] He journeyed more than 75,000 miles (121,000 km), a figure unsurpassed by any individual explorer until the coming of the Steam Age some 450 years later.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 14 Oct '12 02:27 pm

 
  
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2.

Ibn Baah (Arabic: , Ab Abd al-Lh Muammad ibn Abd al-Lh l-Lawt -an ibn Baah), or simply Ibn Battuta ( ), also known as Shams ad-Din[1] (February 25, 13041368 or 1369), was a Berber Muslim Moroccan explorer, known for his extensive travels, accounts of which were published in the Rihla (lit. "Journey"). Over a period of thirty years, he visited most of the known Islamic world as well as many non-Muslim lands; his journeys including trips to North Africa, the Horn of Africa, West Africa, Southern Europe and Eastern Europe in the West, and to the Middle East, South Asia, Central Asia, Southeast Asia and China in the East, a distance surpassing threefold his near-contemporary Marco Polo. Ibn Battuta is considered one of the greatest travellers of all time.[2] He journeyed more than 75,000 miles (121,000 km), a figure unsurpassed by any individual explorer until the coming of the Steam Age some 450 years later.[1]
Source: wiki
Answered by Quest, 14 Oct '12 01:23 pm

 
  
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