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Q.

What does the phrase, `annus horribilis' mean?

Tags: education, religion & spirituality, law & legal
Asked by Whizkid, 24 May '12 12:49 pm
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Answers (6)

 
1.

It is a Latin phrase meaning `horrible year', or the `year of horrors'.
Answered by Anil K Chugh, 24 May '12 12:51 pm

 
  
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2.

It is Latin for "Horrible Year" and was used by Queen Elizabeth in her speech on 24th November 1992 on the 40th anniversary of her reign following the many terrible events of that year.
Answered by Janis, 03 Jun '12 07:14 pm

 
  
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3.

Year of horrors - simply saying
Answered by rajnikant raiyarela, 24 May '12 02:44 pm

 
  
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4.

It simply means : Year of horrors...!
Answered by Dil Se, 24 May '12 01:53 pm

 
  
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5.

A horrible year.
Origin

Derived from the Latin phrase 'annus mirabilis' - year of wonders (or miracles). Recorded since the mid 1980's but brought into popular use after Queen Elizabeth II used it to describe 1992 - the year that the marriages of her two sons Charles and Andrew broke down and Windsor Castle caught fire.

John Dryden used the term 'annus mirabilis' in the title of his epic poem Annus Mirabilis: the year of wonders 1666. The poem was published in 1667 and commemorates the English defeat of the Dutch naval fleet and the Great Fire of London. Dryden apparently considered the fact that much of London was spared from the fire and Charles II's plans for a speedy restoration of the burned districts as a sign that God had performed miracles for England. He seems not to have been swayed in his 'year of wonders' opinion by the continuing Great Plague, which killed 20% of London's population (and which he was well aware of and left London to avoid). Looking back, The Great F ...more
Answered by jameel ahmed, 24 May '12 12:52 pm

 
  
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6.

Horrible year", or alternatively, "year of horrors
Answered by rajan, 24 May '12 12:52 pm

 
  
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