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Q.

How the borders of the oceans are marked ?

Tags: education, science, environment
Asked by sitapati rao, 23 Jan '10 05:01 am
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Answers (3)

1.

U means on map or on ground
Answered by yusuf syed, 23 Jan '10 09:54 am

 
  
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2.

Those conducting oceanic research generally recognize the existence of three major oceans, the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian. (The Arctic Ocean is considered an extension of the Atlantic.) Arbitrary boundaries separate these three bodies of water in the Southern Hemisphere. One boundary extends southward to Antarctica from the Cape of Good Hope, while another stretches southward from Cape Horn. The last one passes through Malaysia and Indonesia to Australia, and then on to Antarctica. Many subdivisions can be made to distinguish the limits of seas and gulfs that have historical, political, and sometimes ecological significance However, water properties, ocean currents, and biological populations do not necessarily recognize these boundaries. Indeed, many researchers do not either. The oceanic area surrounding the Antarctic is considered by some to be the Southern Ocean.

If area-volume analyses of the oceans are to be made, then boundaries must be established to separate individua ...more
Answered by KARTIKAY SHARMA, 23 Jan '10 08:26 am

 
  
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3.

These are marked with blue lines on the map.The world's oceans & seas together cover nearly 71% of the earth's surface. Since the oceans are a continuous body of water on the Earth's surface, it is not possible to have clearly demarcated borders between one ocean and another or any other adjacent water body for that matter. Nevertheless, for the convenience of oceanographers and for other practical purposes, it is generally recognized that the huge body of salt water on the Earth's surface is divided into three major oceans - the Pacific Ocean, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Indian Ocean.
Answered by chhinder pal, 23 Jan '10 08:04 am

 
  
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