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Q.

How would the buoyant force acting on the floating clay shape change if it were immersed in sea?

Tags: relationships, entertainment, environment
Asked by sundaram, 05 Dec '12 12:24 pm
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Answers (3)

1.

F = ma = W - B; where W is the weight of the shape and B is the buoyancy that, because the object is floating, equals the weight. B = W because the object is not accelerating up or down; it's still in the water and floating.
Answered by k gopal, 15 Dec '12 03:15 pm

 
  
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2.

F = ma = W - B; where W is the weight of the shape and B is the buoyancy that, because the object is floating, equals the weight. B = W because the object is not accelerating up or down; it's still in the water and floating.

And that's the clue. When an object floats, the buoyancy B = W the weight of the object. As weight W = mg; where m is the mass and g = 9.81 m/sec^2, the buoyancy remains the same as the fixed weight...no matter what kind of liquid the object is immersed in.

But, and this is a big BUT, what changes is how deep the object is immersed. Because the density of sea water Rho > rho the density of fresh water. The volume of sea water displaced by the object will be less than the volume of fresh water displaced. That follows because it takes less sea water to weigh the same as the fresh water.
Answered by Quest, 05 Dec '12 05:14 pm

 
  
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3.

F = ma = W - B; where W is the weight of the shape and B is the buoyancy that, because the object is floating, equals the weight. B = W because the object is not accelerating up or down; it's still in the water and floating.

And that's the clue. When an object floats, the buoyancy B = W the weight of the object. As weight W = mg; where m is the mass and g = 9.81 m/sec^2, the buoyancy remains the same as the fixed weight...no matter what kind of liquid the object is immersed in.

But, and this is a big BUT, what changes is how deep the object is immersed. Because the density of sea water Rho > rho the density of fresh water. The volume of sea water displaced by the object will be less than the volume of fresh water displaced. That follows because it takes less sea water to weigh the same as the fresh water.

If volume V = AH; where A is the cross sectional area of the object in fresh water, then H is the depth of the object in fresh water. If v = Ah; where h is the depth in sea w ...more
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 05 Dec '12 12:28 pm

 
  
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