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Q.

How the sikhism developed as a a religion??

Tags: religion & spirituality, sikhism developed
Asked by Admn, 14 Mar '13 12:46 am
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Answers (7)

1.

Sikhs remained a persecuted minority until, under the leadership of Rnjit Singh (1780-1839), they managed to take political control in the Punjab region and created a powerful, militaristic kingdom. When they challenged British power, however, they found themselves unable to effectively fight the British army and their kingdom was annexed in 1849. The British treated the Sikhs much better than the Mughal emperors did and actively recruited them into the police and military, allowing the Sikhs to adopt a more positive attitude to these new rulers.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 14 Mar '13 12:54 am

 
  
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2.

I thought you'd know it better
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gill
Answered by The Devil, 27 Mar '13 01:58 am

 
  
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3.

The founder of the Sikh religion was Guru Nanak who was born in 1469. He preached a message of love and understanding and criticized the blind rituals of the Hindus and Muslims. Guru Nanak passed on his enlightened leadership of this new religion to nine successive Gurus. The final living Guru, Guru Gobind Singh died in 1708.
During his lifetime Guru Gobind Singh established the Khalsa order (meaning 'The Pure'), soldier-saints. The Khalsa uphold the highest Sikh virtues of commitment, dedication and a social conscious. The Khalsa are men and women who have undergone the Sikh baptism ceremony and who strictly follow the Sikh Code of Conduct and Conventions and wear the prescribed physical articles of the faith. One of the more noticeable being the uncut hair (required to be covered with a turban for men) and the Kirpan (ceremonial sword).
Before his death in 1708 Guru Gobind Singh declared that the Sikhs no longer needed a living and appointed his spiritual successor as Sri Guru Gra ...more
Answered by yusuf syed, 14 Mar '13 07:01 pm

 
  
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4.

Before his death in 1708 Guru Gobind Singh declared that the Sikhs no longer needed a living and appointed his spiritual successor as Sri Guru Granth Sahib, his physical successor as the Khalsa. Guru Gobind Singh felt that all the wisdom needed by Sikhs for spiritual guidance in their daily lives could be found in Sri Guru Granth Sahib, the Eternal Guru of the Sikhs. Sri Guru Granth Sahib is unique in the world of religious scriptures because not only is it accorded the status of being the spiritual head of the Sikh religion, but besides the poetry of the Gurus, it also contains the writings of saints of other faiths whose thoughts were consistent with those of the Sikh Gurus.
Answered by Quest, 14 Mar '13 12:08 pm

 
  
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5.

Guru Nanak (20 October 1469 - 7 May 1539) is the founder of Sikhism and the first of the ten Sikh Gurus. He was born in the village of Talwandi, now called Nankana Sahib, near Lahore in present-day Pakistan.

His parents, Mehta Kalu and Matta Tripat, were Hindus and belonged to the merchant caste. Even as a boy, Nanak was fascinated by religion, and his desire to explore the mysteries of life eventually led him to leave home.

Nanak married Sulkhni, of Batala, and they had two sons, Sri Chand and Lakhmi Das. His brother-in-law, the husband of his sister Nanki, obtained a job for him in Sultanpur as the manager of the government granary.

One morning, when he was 28, he went as usual down to the river to bathe and meditate. It was said that he was gone for three days. When he reappeared, filled with the spirit of God, he said, "There is no Hindu and no Muslim." It was then he began his missionary work.

Tradition states that he made four great journeys, traveling to all part ...more
Answered by iqbal seth, 14 Mar '13 05:40 am

 
  
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6.

Sikhs are followers of Guru Nanak (b. 1469) and his nine successors (known as Gurus). Nanak had been raised in a Hindu family of the trading caste in a village near Lahore in modern day Pakistan, but experienced a mystical conversion around the age of twenty-nine or thirty which, according to him, revealed the nature of the True God and required him to spread a message of unity and love.

Some reports of his early life indicate that he was long inclined to mystical beliefs and the he spent quite a lot of time with local Fakirs. He appears to have had little interest in mundane, temporal affairs and spent most of his time in meditation and religious contemplation.

After his conversion experience, Nanak traveled across India and even further, visiting cities like Baghdad, Medina and Mecca, in an attempt to learn more about people's religious traditions. After about twenty years, he returned and took to leading his new followers in the teachings he had received from God and writing d ...more
Answered by vedprakash sharma, 14 Mar '13 01:23 am

 
  
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7.

During his lifetime Guru Gobind Singh established the Khalsa order (meaning 'The Pure'), soldier-saints. The Khalsa uphold the highest Sikh virtues of commitment, dedication and a social conscious. The Khalsa are men and women who have undergone the Sikh baptism ceremony and who strictly follow the Sikh Code of Conduct and Conventions and wear the prescribed physical articles of the faith. One of the more noticeable being the uncut hair (required to be covered with a turban for men) and the Kirpan (ceremonial sword).

Before his death in 1708 Guru Gobind Singh declared that the Sikhs no longer needed a living and appointed his spiritual successor as Sri Guru Granth Sahib, his physical successor as the Khalsa. Guru Gobind Singh felt that all the wisdom needed by Sikhs for spiritual guidance in their daily lives could be found in Sri Guru Granth Sahib, the Eternal Guru of the Sikhs. Sri Guru Granth Sahib is unique in the world of religious scriptures because not only is it accorded the ...more
Answered by anil garg, 14 Mar '13 01:00 am

 
  
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