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Q.

How natural disasters get their names?

Tags: education, computers & internet, natural disasters
Asked by ankit shivam, 03 Nov '12 02:53 pm
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Answers (6)

 
1.

In case of storm in asia region countries india,pak.,bengladesh,maldevies,thailand, s/l,,oman and myamnar name cyclones one by one.the neelam was named by pakistan, next has been decide by s/l and will be known !mahasen! .similar rules are in other countries.
Answered by Ramesh Agarwal, 03 Nov '12 03:06 pm

 
  
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2.

It is picked randomly
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 03 Nov '12 03:02 pm

 
  
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3.

Its a random name list, from which name is chosen whenever there is a new storm coming
Answered by gaurav, 03 Nov '12 02:58 pm

 
  
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4.

Meterological department of the concerned nation assign the names to the TWISTERS ....
Answered by Pradipta pati, 03 Nov '12 02:56 pm

 
  
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5.

Meterology dept is giving the names
But why they select female names?
Katrina
Neelam
Etc etc
Answered by sigma, 03 Nov '12 02:54 pm

 
  
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6.

What's in a name? Plenty, if you're a tropical storm. Those storms that graduate to hurricanes could end up with their names etched in history, for all of the wrong reasons, if they're violent and lethal enough. Others, of course, could disappear from the news without a whimper as they either break apart before landfall or do very little damage. In either case, naming them isn't as trivial as it sounds: Weather officials name tropical storms and hurricanes in order to classify them, as well as to better report on them to the public. It's not a new phenomenon either. Tropical storms have been given names for hundreds of years; originally, a storm would be named for the Catholic saint upon whose day it made landfall. As time went on, however, the naming patterns began to change.

Today, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), an agency of the United Nations, is in charge of naming the Atlantic tropical storms that sometimes become hurricanes. The WMO took over for the National Hur ...more
Answered by manvika, 03 Nov '12 03:01 pm

 
  
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