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Q.

How many Arabic loanwords are there in English?

Tags: careers, english, religion & spirituality
Asked by TRUTH SEEKER, 04 May '12 09:46 pm
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Answers (3)

1.

The Arabic language has contributed hundreds of words to the English language by many different routes. Thats partly because in what my daughter likes to call the olden days (from around 700AD to the Middle Ages), the Arabic kingdoms had a great influence on Europe and the world. In part this was through colonisation, but there were also many great mathematicians, alchemists and astronomers.

Of course, language development is not that simple. Not all the words that have entered English via Arabic originate from that language. Linguistically speaking, the Arabs borrowed as freely as they lent and their language included words originating from Spanish, Latin, Greek, Persian, Hebrew and many others. Many of the words start with the Arabic definite article al, which also appears in silent form without the l in words such as admiral. Heres a list of some of the common words that the Arabic language has bequeathed to English.

admiral
adobe
alchemy via Greek
alcohol ...more
Answered by anil garg, 04 May '12 09:54 pm

 
  
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2.

Huge numbers , this space is not enough
Loanwords listed in alphabetical order

admiral
amr, commander. Amr al-bihr = "commander of the seas" was a title in use in Arabic Sicily, and was continued by the Normans in Sicily in a Latinized form, and then adopted successively by medieval Genoese and French. Modern French is "amiral". An English form under King Edward III (14th century) was "Amyrel of the Se". Insertion of the 'd' was doubtless influenced by allusion to common Latin "admire".[2] [1]
adobe
al-ba | at-tba,[3] "the brick". The Arabic dictionary of Al-Jawhari dated about year 1000 made the comment that the Arabic word came from the Coptic language.[4] The first record of the word in a Western language is in 12th century Spanish.[5] Other cases of Arabic 't' becoming medieval Spanish 'd' include es:Badana and es:Badea.[6] The word entered English from Mexico in the 18th and 19th centuries. [2]
albatross
al-ghas, literally "the diver", presumably a cormorant or oth ...more
Answered by hazir jawab, 04 May '12 09:48 pm

 
  
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3.

In alphabetic order let me quote some words
admiral
adobe
alchemy via Greek
alcohol the quintessence of earthly substances, originally from alchemy
alcove
algebra restoration of missing parts, later used in a 9th century mathematical book written by a Persian scientist whose name gave us algorithm
almanac
amber
apricot ...more
Answered by jameel ahmed, 05 May '12 10:08 am

 
  
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The Arabic language has contributed hundreds of words to the English language by many different routes. Thats partly because in what my daughter likes..more

Answered by Ataur Rahman