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Q.

What is a shamrock?

Asked by sumeet, 26 Jun '08 08:17 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

Amazing Saint Patrick's Day 2012
Go here
http://fsquarefashion.com/2012/03/st-patricks-day-quotes-blessi ngs-sayings-poems-jokes-2012/
http://fsquarefashion.com/2012/03/ saint-patricks-day-wallpapers-images-scraps-photos-greetings-wish es-2012/
Source: http://fsquarefashion.com/
Answered by heena dahiya, 13 Mar '12 06:59 pm

 
  
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2.

The shamrock, a symbol of Ireland and a registered trademark of the Republic of Ireland,[1] is a three-leafed old white clover, sometimes of the variety Trifolium repens (a white clover, known in Irish as seamair bhn) but today usually Trifolium dubium (a lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhu).

The diminutive version of the Irish word for "clover" ("seamair") is "seamrg", which was anglicised as "shamrock", representing a close approximation of the original Irish pronunciation. However, other three-leafed plants such as black medic (Medicago lupulina), red clover (Trifolium pratense), and Common wood sorrel (genus Oxalis) are sometimes designated as shamrocks. The shamrock was traditionally used for its medical properties and was a popular motif in Victorian times. It is also a common way to represent St. Patrick's Day. Shamrocks are said to bring good luck.

Answered by sudesh, 26 Jun '08 08:22 pm

 
  
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3.

The word shamrock comes from the Irish word "seamrog" meaning "little clover". However, there are hundreds of varieties of clover. The question is...what is the "Original Irish Shamrock"? Here is what some respected authorities have to say:

"The true Irish Shamrock, as identified by Nathaniel Colgan c. 1893 is a clover. It is not one of any or many clovers, it is one species, collected from a majority of counties at that time and with the exception of a very few plants, the majority were Trifolium repens or a form of this plant - White clover also known as Dutch Clover". 'From Ireland' Jane Lyons, Dublin, Ireland

"White Clover, Trifolium repens forma minus, family Leguminosae, was the original shamrock of Ireland..." Academic American Encyclopedia, Vol. 17, 1990.

"In Ireland, the plant most often referred to as shamrock is the white clover." The World Book Encyclopedia, Vol. 17, 1993.

"Those most commonly called shamrocks are: the white clover, Trifolium repens, a creepin ...more
Answered by rajaganapathy kamatchinathan, 26 Jun '08 08:19 pm

 
  
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4.

The shamrock, a symbol of Ireland and a registered trademark of the Republic of Ireland, is a three-leafed old white clover, sometimes of the variety Trifolium repens but today usually Trifolium dubium. Shamrocks are said to bring good luck.
Answered by samron jude, 26 Jun '08 08:18 pm

 
  
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