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Q.

How does shape of an object make things float?

Tags: relationships, arts & culture, religion & spirituality
Asked by gurpreet, 27 Dec '12 11:32 pm
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Answers (8)

 
1.

Shape does not make, but the location of centre of buoyancy w.r.t to centre of gravity hv influence on stability of the floating body. If CB is below CG, the buoy will over turn.
Answered by MAdhavan Avadhany, 27 Dec '12 11:34 pm

 
  
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2.

For an object to float in water a key condition has to be met. The volume of water displaced by the object must weigh the same as the object. The principle involved is known as Archimedes' principle. Though it may be a bit of a tricky concept at first, a simple example serves to illustrate the principle.
Answered by Quest, 28 Dec '12 12:07 pm

 
  
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3.

For an object to float in water a key condition has to be met. The volume of water displaced by the object must weigh the same as the object. The principle involved is known as Archimedes' principle. Though it may be a bit of a tricky concept at first, a simple example serves to illustrate the principle.
Consider a mass of steel, say, the size and shape of a bowling ball. When placed in water it will sink. But the same mass of steel made into the shape of a bowl, when placed in water so that the concave side of the bowl is facing up, will float
Answered by aflatoon, 28 Dec '12 10:01 am

 
  
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4.

When you change the shape you are also changing the density of the object, like for instance if you take a paper boat and put it into water it will float, but if you shape something into a ball it becomes compact and will sink. that is because its weight is more than what the displaced water weighs.
Answered by iqbal seth, 28 Dec '12 07:04 am

 
  
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5.

When the volume of the water displaced is more than the volume of the body,it floats. So ,if you shape a body such that while immersing, it diplaces volume exceeding its own volume of liquid in which they are immersed, it will float
Answered by Ganadhisha, 28 Dec '12 02:28 am

 
  
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6.

The density of the water and the object affects the objects bouyancy. If the object is less dense than the water, it will float. If it is more dense it will sink. Also, when diving, adding air to your mass, (whether by inhaling or inflating your BCD) you will tend to float. If you exhale or deflate your BCD you will sink. When you float the term is called positively buoyant. When you sink the term is called negatively buoyant. When you neither float nor sink, you are neutrally buoyant.
Answered by jafar, 28 Dec '12 01:11 am

 
  
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7.

Relatively a flat object whose cross-sectional area is relatively more than its mass...by which it can displace more water than its weight so that it can float on the surface of water....
Answered by Pradipta pati, 27 Dec '12 11:38 pm

 
  
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8.

Weight of water rplaced is more than wt. of the thing
Answered by Om Shrivastava, 27 Dec '12 11:35 pm

 
  
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