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Q.

How does AL-NINO affect the progress of monsoon ??

Tags: environment, al nino, nino
Asked by Pathline Channel, 12 Jun 01:47 pm
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Answers (4)

 
1.

There is a rather weak correlation between El Nino and the Indian monsoon rains.

Indian monsoon affects other regions of south and southeast Asia and Australia is the most monetarily important because of its profound influence on the economy of India and neighboring countries. It is directly linked to the ENSO phenomenon. In summer months, temperatures over much of India rise to as high as one hundred ten degrees Fahrenheit while the Indian Ocean is much cooler. Consequently, the warm air over the land rises and cooler moisture-bearing air blows in from the sea, bringing heavy rains to the region.
Answered by Stone Heart, 12 Jun 01:56 pm

 
  
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2.

I don't think that 'El-Nino' has anything to do with the monsoon, because both are from different origins....!
Answered by Dil Se, 12 Jun 01:53 pm

 
  
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3.

Perhaps no affect of Al-Nino on Monsoon. Al-Nino dwells in Pacific and monsoon is Indian Ocean phenomenon.
Answered by QueSera Sera, 12 Jun 01:49 pm

 
  
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4.

In normal, non-El Nio conditions (top panel of schematic diagram), the trade winds blow towards the west across the tropical Pac:ific. These winds pile up warm surface water in the west Pacific, so that the sea surface is about HALF meter higher at Indonesia than at Ecuador.

The sea surface temperature is about EIGHT degrees C higher in the west, with cool temperatures off South America, due to an pwelling of cold water from deeper levels. This cold water is nutrient-rich, supporting high levels of primary productivity, diverse marine ecosystems, and major fisheries. Rainfall is found in rising air over the warmest water, and the east Pacific is relatively dry. During El Nio , the trade winds relax in the central and western Pacific leading to a depression of the thermocline in
the eastern Pacific, and an elevation of the thermocline in the west. during 1982-1983, the 17-degree isotherm dropped to about 150m depth. This reduced the efficiency of upwelling to cool the

suface an ...more
Source: http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/elnino/el-nino-story.html
Answered by KARTIKAY SHARMA, 12 Jun 02:02 pm

 
  
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