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Q.

How do red and green filter works in 3d eye glasses?

Tags: health, beauty & fashion, technology
Asked by John, 09 Nov '12 01:57 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

The old style colored 3D glasses use a method called Complementary Color Anaglyphs.These work by using a filter to block certain colors from each eye. The most commonly seen glasses utilize a red and cyan lens to pass red to one eye and blue and green to the others. At first this could only work with a black and white image since the filters blocked colors but modern methods allow for color viewing although the colors will be muted. Other methods of this technique use red and green filters or blue and amber filters. Although improvements have been made with this method of creating a 3D effect it is still considered inferior to polarization methods due to color loss.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 09 Nov '12 03:14 pm

 
  
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2.

Hi John, LG WRman Sherlock here,

In the simplest term, analyph 3D (or red green filter 3D glasses) work by letting your eyes see the same image with different color so as to separate the view coming to each eye, which in turns tricks the brain into perceiving depth (another dimension) in a 2D image. However, this technology is quickly becoming obsolete. Passive 3D technology which is used prominently in LG World Record 3D TVs is now the new thing. It uses polarizing lenses which functions in the same line as the analyph 3D but with much more effectiveness and can create a very powerful 3D depth perception.

If you have any other questions, visit us at our forum: www.lgwrforum.com

LG WRman Sherlock out!
Answered by Sherlock WRman, 07 Dec '12 01:51 pm

 
  
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3.

For you to see in 3d each eye sees everything from a slightly different angle, off set to the right or left like a finger right in front of your face. If you look at something a few inches in front of your face you will notice how your eyes must also cross to look at it. If you look at something far away they uncross or get more parallel. So your eyes are seeing two images of the finger in front of your face, on for each eye. So to see in 3d we need double images of everything and then only one image can go to one eye and the other image only to the other eye, just like in real life. The left lens must block the image for the right eye and the right lens must block the left eye image.
Answered by Quest, 09 Nov '12 03:17 pm

 
  
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4.

For you to see in 3d each eye sees everything from a slightly different angle, off set to the right or left like a finger right in front of your face. If you look at something a few inches in front of your face you will notice how your eyes must also cross to look at it. If you look at something far away they uncross or get more parallel. So your eyes are seeing two images of the finger in front of your face, on for each eye. So to see in 3d we need double images of everything and then only one image can go to one eye and the other image only to the other eye, just like in real life. The left lens must block the image for the right eye and the right lens must block the left eye image.

Anaglyph glasses that are red and blue use those colors to block and unblock images. The double images are red and blue as well.

In the theater they use polarized light. All images for the left eye have one light wave and all images for the right eye have a second different light wave. Then the rig ...more
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 09 Nov '12 01:57 pm

 
  
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