Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

How Did the Spread of Islam Affect the Development of Science?

Tags: science, islam, development
Asked by azam khan, 22 Apr '13 01:53 pm
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (6)

1.

Islam instructs man to use his powers of intelligence and observation. Within a few years of the spread of Islam, great civilizations and universities were flourishing. The synthesis of Eastern and Western ideas, and of new thought with old, brought about great advances in medicine, mathematics, physics, astronomy, geography, architecture, art, literature, and history. Many crucial systems, such as algebra, the Arabic numerals, and the concept of zero (vital to the advancement of mathematics), were transmitted to medieval Europe from the Muslim world. Sophisticated instruments which were to make possible the European voyages of discovery, such as the astrolabe, the quadrant, and good navigational maps, were also developed by Muslims.
Answered by sudhakar kuruvada, 22 Apr '13 01:57 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

The French philosopher Gustave le Bon stated in his book The Civilization of the Arabs:

We must bear in mind that the Arabs and the Arabs alone are the ones who guided us to the ancient world of the Greeks and Romans. European universities, including the University of Paris, based their curricula on translations of their books for six hundred years and used their methods of research. The Islamic civilization was one of the most amazing that history has ever known. End quote.

The Muslims are not like anyone else. When they adhere to their religion, they are at the forefront in worldly affairs too, but when they forsake their religion and neglect it, they end up tailing behind others. When the Christians adhered to their deviant religion, they were backward in worldly affairs, but when they burned their churches, killed their monks and separated church from state, they advanced in worldly affairs and in science. The Muslims religion motivates them to advance, and they fall behind ...more
Answered by Psycho, 22 Apr '13 01:54 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (2)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

The biggest influence it had was to unite an enormous area of the Eurasian-African landmass in a shared religious, cultural and linguistic unity, based on the Islamic religion and the Arabic language. This is not to suggest that the Islamic world was culturally uniform (it was very diverse), but this unification did make the transit of people, trade items, and ideas and cultural norms very much easier. So you had, for example, enormous trade routes between western Europe and south-east Asia opened up because of the shared Islamic religion and language. You had world travelers like Ibn Batutah who travelled vast areas of the Earth's surface without leaving the Dar al-Islam. If anything, it is rather like the Hellenistic era, in which Greek culture united a vast area of the known world following the conquests of Alexander the Great, except the area in which Islam prevailed was much greater.
Answered by Ataur Rahman, 09 Oct '13 11:28 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

It was leading during medieval ages.
Answered by Quest, 22 Apr '13 09:01 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
5.

It happened only till about 16th or 17th century after that why it stopped
Answered by rajan, 22 Apr '13 01:57 pm

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (0)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining