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Q.

How did Manasa Devi get adoration on Earth?

Tags: earth, entertainment, devi
Asked by lalit mahata, 19 Apr '13 07:33 am
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Answers (4)

 
1.

In Hindu mythology, Mansa Devi is the goddess of snakes, worshipped for the prevention and cure of snakebite and also for fertility and prosperity. She is the sister of Vasuki, the king of Nagas
Answered by Anil K Chugh, 19 Apr '13 06:46 pm

 
  
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2.

Originally an Adivasi (tribal) goddess, Manasa was accepted in the pantheon worshipped by Hindu lower caste groups. Later, she was included in a higher caste Hindu pantheon, where she is now regarded as a Hindu goddess rather than a tribal one.[3] In Ancient Greece, there is a goddess named Manasa found in the records of Mycenae, written as ma-na-sa in Linear B.[5] As a Hindu goddess, she was recognized as a daughter of sage Kashyapa and Kadru, the mother of all Ngas. By the 14th century, Manasa was identified as the goddess of fertility and marriage rites and was assimilated into the Shaiva pantheon as a relative of Shiva. Myths glorified her by describing that she saved Shiva after he drank poison, and venerated her as the "remover of poison". Her popularity grew and spread to southern India, and her cult began to rival Shaivism itself. As a consequence, stories attributing Manasa's birth to Shiva emerged and ultimately Shaivism adopted this indigenous goddess into the Brahmanical tr ...more
Answered by Quest, 19 Apr '13 11:21 am

 
  
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3.

Manas or Padm was recognized as a form of Shakti, and her worship accepted by Shaivas. She is a phase of the mother-divinity who for so many worshippers is nearer and dearer than the far-off and impersonal Shiva.

Generally, Manasa is worshipped without an image. A branch of a tree, an earthen pot or an earthen snake image is worshipped as the goddess, though images of Manasa are worshipped too.
Answered by rajan, 19 Apr '13 08:51 am

 
  
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4.

Shaktism focuses worship upon the Hindu Divine Mother, here represented[clarification needed] as (foreground) Lajja Gauri or Aditi, the original Mother of the Cosmos, and (background) as the mystical yantra known as Sri Meru. Shaktism (Sanskrit: kta, ; lit., 'doctrine of power' or 'doctrine of the Goddess') is a denomination of Hinduism that focuses worship upon Shakti or Devi the Hindu Divine Mother as the absolute, ultimate Godhead. It is, along with Shaivism and Vaisnavism, one of the primary schools of devotional Hinduism.

Shaktism regards Devi (lit., 'the Goddess') as the Supreme Brahman itself, the "one without a second", with all other forms of divinity, female or male, considered to be merely her diverse manifestations. In the details of its philosophy and practice, Shaktism resembles Shaivism. However, Shaktas (Sanskrit: kta, ), practitioners of Shaktism, focus most or all worship on Shakti, as the dynamic feminine aspect of the Supreme Divine. Shiva, the masculine aspect ...more
Source: wiki
Answered by jameel ahmed, 19 Apr '13 07:39 am

 
  
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