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Q.

How are lakes formed?

Tags: lakes formed
Asked by S L, 29 Nov '12 03:38 pm
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Answers (8)

 
1.

Natural lakes can form by various processes. Although many of these processes occurred in the geologic past, lakes continue to form and to be destroyed. For example, an earthquake-triggered landslide created Lake Sarez in Tajikistan only three generations ago. In May 1980, Spirit Lake at the foot of Mount Saint Helens, Washington (USA) was greatly reduced in size when the volcano erupted, pouring rock, mud, and debris into the one-popular resort lake.
Answered by Quest, 29 Nov '12 06:24 pm

 
  
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2.

Natural lakes can form by various processes. Although many of these processes occurred in the geologic past, lakes continue to form and to be destroyed. For example, an earthquake-triggered landslide created Lake Sarez in Tajikistan only three generations ago. In May 1980, Spirit Lake at the foot of Mount Saint Helens, Washington (USA) was greatly reduced in size when the volcano erupted, pouring rock, mud, and debris into the one-popular resort lake.
Answered by rajan, 10 May '13 08:29 am

 
  
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3.

Natural lakes can form by various processes. Although many of these processes occurred in the geologic past, lakes continue to form and to be destroyed. For example, an earthquake-triggered landslide created Lake Sarez in Tajikistan only three generations ago. In May 1980, Spirit Lake at the foot of Mount Saint Helens, Washington (USA) was greatly reduced in size when the volcano erupted, pouring rock, mud, and debris into the one-popular resort lake.
Answered by manoharkhanna, 07 Apr '13 04:38 am

 
  
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4.

A lake is formed when the river meanders over a period of time and forms a deep curve. When the river overflows, the power of the water does not curve, but breaks through and continues on. The circle of water left standing is a lake also known as an oxbow lake.
Source: google search
Answered by anil garg, 29 Nov '12 04:16 pm

 
  
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5.

A lake is formed when the river meanders over a period of time and forms a deep curve. When the river overflows, the power of the water does not curve, but breaks through and continues on. The circle of water left standing is a lake also known as an oxbow lake.
Answered by iqbal seth, 12 Jul '13 11:31 am

 
  
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6.

Natural lakes can form by various processes. Although many of these processes occurred in the geologic past, lakes continue to form and to be destroyed. For example, an earthquake-triggered landslide created Lake Sarez in Tajikistan only three generations ago. In May 1980, Spirit Lake at the foot of Mount Saint Helens, Washington (USA) was greatly reduced in size when the volcano erupted, pouring rock, mud, and debris into the one-popular resort lake.
Answered by aflatoon, 29 Nov '12 04:01 pm

 
  
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7.

Lakes are formed in the ground depressions where groundwater table is above ground level.
Answered by bhaskara rao, 29 Nov '12 03:44 pm

 
  
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8.

Lakes are bodies of water surrounded by land. Lakes generally have fresh water, while oceans and seas have salt water. While lakes are a small percentage of the earth's total water, they are important for our economy and transportation.

A lake does not flow along a certain path as a river does. Lakes are larger than ponds.

Lakes were formed many thousands of years ago by glaciers. At that time, huge glaciers covered the earth. When the glaciers melted, some of the water that was over hollows in the earth became lakes.

Other ways lakes were formed include man made lakes, natural dams and craters formed in great volcanic explosions.

Lakes get bigger and smaller, depending on many factors. Lakes get smaller if they get filled up with silt or other material. They also dry up if they are not replenished with water through rainfall. Other lakes get deeper and bigger as rivers, rainfall and underground water make the lake expand.
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 29 Nov '12 03:40 pm

 
  
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