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Q.

How animals tolerate / survive severe cold in winter?

Tags: health, environment, beauty & fashion
Asked by Joseph Chacko, 07 Jan '13 02:35 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

For many animals, food sources are buried under snow or ice. Deep snow is not a problem for all creatures. To field mice, it is a protective layer against most predators. To predators, deep snow means a time of going hungry.
Specialized adaptation to winter involves exploring chemistry, physics, and animal behavior. Managing an energy budget is the key to survival. There are many ways to manage this budget, primarily through combinations of physical attributes (morphology, habitat, and behavior) and physiological capabilities (body chemistry and metabolic controls).
Answered by LIPSIKA, 07 Jan '13 02:42 pm

 
  
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2.

God has made them so..weather frndly.
Answered by Manju Sikri, 07 Jan '13 07:01 pm

 
  
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3.

There is a wide array of morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations for winter survival. A few examples are provided below, but investigations into the lives of active winter animals will reveal many combinations of survival strategies.

Bergmann's Rule states that northern species of a particular genus or similar class of birds or mammals tend to be larger in size, although this is not always true. Larger body size means a higher body mass-to-surface area ratio. It's easier to retain heat. Polar bears are larger than tropical bears. White-tailed deer in Michigan dress out at higher weights than their counterparts in Texas or Florida.
Body appendages tend to get smaller in the north, as a heat conservation measure. Snowshoe hares have smaller ears that cottontail rabbits. Mammalian legs and snouts are frequently shorter and stouter.
Specialized fat, called brown fat, is produced during the food-rich seasons and expended during cold seasons. This ...more
Source: Read More :- http://mff.dsisd.net/Environment/WinterAnimals.htm
Answered by anantharaman, 07 Jan '13 03:46 pm

 
  
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4.

There are three main strategies to surviving inclement conditions, migration, dormancy, and toughing it out. Each species is suited to a particular variant of one strategy or the other, or a combination of strategic elements.

1. Migration and Movement. Many species migrate between seasons. Some, such as the arctic tern, travel 10,000 miles between winter and summer habitats. It's difficult to ignore the migration of geese, cranes, and ducks . . . and difficult to believe that monarch butterflies actually migrate to Mexico. How in the world do tiny hummingbirds fly all the way across the Gulf of Mexico? The return of the colorful and vociferous warblers becomes obvious in the Spring, but their departure in the Fall is generally missed. The first Spring bluebird is noted by many . . . but few can mark their departure date.

Migration is not always a dramatic, long-distance affair. Other species, such as white-tailed deer, move to areas that are more survivable. Deer pre ...more
Answered by Venkatanarasimha, 07 Jan '13 02:40 pm

 
  
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