Using your phone's internet browser
go to:  qna.rediff.com
Click and drag this link to
the Home icon in your browser.
Q.

HORN PLEASE OK: The term bears its roots in the second world war where trucks were often run on kerosene when there was a shortage of petrol. Kerosene, being highly unstable in nature, would cause the trucks to explode at the slightest accident. Hence a warning would be painted on the back saying "Horn Please OK (On Kerosene)".
Gradually this became a norm and is still seen on most trucks even today.
Thanks.
Source: wiki

Tags: thanks, money, relationships
Asked by Idea, 09 Jun '13 09:54 am
  Invite a friend  |  
  Save  |  
 Earn 10 points for answering
Answer this question  Earn 10 points for answering    
4000 characters remaining  
  
    
Keep me signed inNew User? Sign up

Answers (6)

1.

Sorry, FYI kerosene was never used in truck's -

in earlier times the roads were single track, so before over taking any vehicle you had to honk - that's when the driver in the front switched on the OK light

that's why it's HORN PLEASE (for rear vehicle) and OK (green light) to overtake
Source: as per my information
Answered by simon waaras, 09 Jun '13 11:17 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
2.

Soochna ke liye bahut hee dhanyavad
Answered by rajan, 09 Jun '13 10:48 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
3.

Well, than you for the information....!
Answered by Dil Se, 09 Jun '13 10:39 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
4.

In fact, kerosene is less inflammable and volatile, that to commercial grade kerosene. Plz chk the same wiki for the data.
Answered by MAdhavan Avadhany, 09 Jun '13 10:01 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
5.

Good wikileaks
Answered by Mike Tison, 09 Jun '13 09:58 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received
6.

Not on my truck
Answered by Ghost Singh, 09 Jun '13 09:58 am

 
  
Report abuse
Useful
 (1)
Not Useful
 (0)
Your vote on this answer has already been received

Ask a Question

Get answers from the community

600 characters remaining