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Q.

What is the alkalinity of water?

Asked by muthukarthik, 18 Aug '08 06:29 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

Alkali in chemistry means the opposite of acidic. This can be an ionic salt or an alkaline earth metal or element like beryllium (Be), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), sodium hydroxide and ammonia. If these are present in the water, they react with it and turn the water alkaline.
Answered by Zeus, 18 Aug '08 06:44 pm

 
  
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2.

Water is neither alkaline nor acidic.its ph value =7..so its basically neutral
Answered by pallawi, 18 Aug '08 06:33 pm

 
  
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3.

Alkalinity refers to the capability of water to neutralize acid. This is really an expression of buffering capacity. A buffer is a solution to which an acid can be added without changing the concentration of available H+ ions (without changing the pH) appreciably. It essentially absorbs the excess H+ ions and protects the water body from fluctuations in pH. In most natural water bodies in Kentucky the buffering system is carbonate-bicarbonate (CO2HCO3 CO32-). The presence of calcium carbonate or other compounds such as magnesium carbonate contribute carbonate ions to the buffering system. Alkalinity is often related to hardness because the main source of alkalinity is usually from carbonate rocks (limestone) which are mostly CaCO3. If CaCO3 actually accounts for most of the alkalinity, hardness in CaCO3 is equal to alkalinity. Since hard water contains metal carbonates (mostly CaCO3) it is high in alkalinity. Conversely, unless carbonate is associated with sodium or potassium which don ...more
Answered by jameel ahmed, 18 Aug '08 06:35 pm

 
  
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4.

The alkalinity of water is a measure of how much acid it can neutralize. If any changes are made to the water that could raise or lower the pH value, alkalinity acts as a buffer, protecting the water and its life forms from sudden shifts in pH. This ability to neutralize acid, or H+ ions, is particularly important in regions affected by acid rain. When acid rain falls, it is not neutralized, so the pH of the water decreases. This drop in the pH level can harm or even kill some of the aquatic organisms in the lake. The lake on the left, however, has high alkalinity. When acid rain falls in this lake, the acid is partially neutralized and the pH of the water remains fairly constant. In this way, a high alkalinity level helps maintain the health of the water and the organisms that live there. Alkalinity should not be confused with pH. The pH of a solution is a measure of the concentration of acid, or H+ ions, in the water. Alkalinity is a measure of the waters capacity to neutralize an a ...more
Answered by vipul, 18 Aug '08 06:42 pm

 
  
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