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Q.

Is the Naxal problem in India bigger than cross-border terrorism?

Tags: india, sports, education
Asked by cyrus irani, 05 Apr '10 06:51 pm
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Answers (4)

 
1.

Seeking doubling of Central force deployment in extremist-infested areas of the state, Orissa government has described the naxalite problem to be much bigger than cross-border terrorism.

This view was expressed at a two-day consultation meeting of the Commission on Centre State Relationship (CCSR) that ended here on Wednesday.

As the problem was serious, it was unjustified to leave the responsibility of tackling the menace on the state government alone, Orissas Panchayati Raj minister Raghuath Mohanty said while presenting the states case favouring a two-fold increase in deployment of Central forces in Maoist-hit areas.

In many ways, naxal problem is much bigger than cross border terrorism...Therefore, the nation should tackle it with the same degree of seriousness as in case of terrorism, he said
Answered by anantharaman, 05 Apr '10 07:25 pm

 
  
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2.

Naxalism is like an insurgency movement and it is much difficult to tackle than terrorist warefare. Besides the Naxals are hand in glove with the political establishment and this makes the job even more difficult
Answered by Saj Sierra, 05 Apr '10 07:26 pm

 
  
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3.

Yep it is because the Naxals are very much our own citizens, who have picked up arms after having seen enough of getting sidelined by the economic system. This sort of origin makes a solution a nightmare 4 a govt, because if a group is seeking a separate homeland on behalf of an enemy state, u can talk to them and make concessions.

Let's say I am representing a Kashmirian separatist outfit and u r representing Indian Govt....this is how our talks will go....

ME: I want a separate homeland for Kashmir!
YOU: We can give you more autonomy, you can have your own say in creating state wide policy but then you have to answer to the Govt of India.
ME: Ok! That means Shariat law rules supreme on my land? We are clear on dat?
YOU: YEs, if you want it that way but then you would also have to make provisions to have India marked in your state. We need public offices to maintain our presence there.....
ME: That's fine but the CRPF needs to go!
YOU: That is acceptable, but can we repl ...more
Answered by A Moin, 06 Apr '10 04:28 am

 
  
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4.

Is there any doubt
Answered by jameel ahmed, 05 Apr '10 07:30 pm

 
  
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