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Q.

Do black holes really exist?

Tags: black holes
Asked by anupama kumar, 26 Dec '10 08:27 pm
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Answers (8)

1.

Yes
Answered by Sunil Kumar, 15 Feb '11 04:34 pm

 
  
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2.

Yes, science has proved that too...!
Answered by Dil Se, 28 Jan '11 09:42 am

 
  
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3.

Yes, please, they do
Answered by sumati gayki, 28 Jan '11 09:40 am

 
  
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4.

Astronomers have found convincing evidence for a supermassive black hole in the center of the giant elliptical galaxy M87, as well as in several other galaxies. The discovery is based on velocity measurements of a whirlpool of hot gas orbiting the black hole. In 1994, Hubble Space Telescope data produced an unprecedented measurement of the mass of an unseen object at the center of M87. Based on the kinetic energy of the material whirling about the center (as in Wheeler's dance, see Question 4 above), the object is about 3 billion times the mass of our Sun and appears to be concentrated into a space smaller than our solar system.

For many years x-ray emission from the double-star system Cygnus X-1 convinced many astronomers that the system contains a black hole. With more precise measurements available recently, the evidence for a black hole in Cygnus X-1 is very strong.
Source: google search
Answered by anil garg, 26 Dec '10 09:48 pm

 
  
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5.

Yes, please, they do
Answered by rajan, 26 Dec '10 09:01 pm

 
  
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6.

Yes they are those who absorb the light totally, as light cant escape, we cant see those, thus they are called as black holes.
Answered by harshendu madge, 26 Dec '10 08:33 pm

 
  
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7.

Yes.
According to the general theory of relativity, a black hole is a region of space from which nothing, including light, can escape. It is the result of the deformation of space-time caused by a very compact mass. Around a black hole there is an undetectable surface which marks the point of no return, called an event horizon. It is called "black" because it absorbs all the light that hits it, reflecting nothing, just like a perfect black body in thermodynamics. Under the theory of quantum mechanics black holes possess a temperature and emit Hawking radiation.
Despite its invisible interior, a black hole can be observed through its interaction with other matter. A black hole can be inferred by tracking the movement of a group of stars that orbit a region in space. Alternatively, when gas falls into a stellar black hole from a companion star, the gas spirals inward, heating to very high temperatures and emitting large amounts of radiation that can be detected from earthbound and Eart ...more
Source: wikipedia
Answered by Third Eye, 26 Dec '10 08:29 pm

 
  
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8.

Any doubt???? Even astronomers have found evidence.

From wiki,

Astronomers have identified numerous stellar black hole candidates, and have also found evidence of supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies. In 1998, astronomers found compelling evidence that a supermassive black hole of more than 2 million solar masses is located near the Sagittarius A* region in the center of the Milky Way galaxy. More recent results using additional data indicate that the supermassive black hole is more than 4 million solar masses.
Source: wiki
Answered by kumar bhat, 26 Dec '10 08:28 pm

 
  
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