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Q.

If Buddhists don't worship Buddha, why are there so many Buddha statues? And why are offerings made to them?

Tags: buddha, religion & spirituality, buddhists don
Asked by spandana k, 23 Jan '13 07:06 am
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Answers (7)

 
1.

Although the Buddha originally requested that no idol be created in his image, over time some schools of Buddhism modified this view, and Buddha statues and paintings are now prevalent. In fact, within some schools of Tibetan Buddhism, creating mandalas and other sacred art that incorporate images of Buddha is itself considered a form of Buddhist practice. However, bows or offering made to these statues are not considered forms of worship, since the Buddha is not considered a God. They are instead a way of paying respect, and a form of spiritual practice designed to generate humility and appreciation.
Answered by LIPSIKA, 23 Jan '13 07:10 am

 
  
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2.

Just they are paying respect to Buddha by idol worship.
Answered by anantharaman, 23 Jan '13 12:36 pm

 
  
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3.

Many different sects originated later on which erected idols of buddha.
Answered by Quest, 23 Jan '13 11:02 am

 
  
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4.

Voltaire, famously, said that "if God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him"
He was (probably) trying to make a point that the existence of God and/or belief in God are beneficial and necessary for civilized society to function.
For the same reason, while Lord Buddha did not talk about existence of any Creator, His followers felt the need of a God.
And, for them, who could better represent God than the Master Himself?
Thus over a period of time they turned Him into a deity and started worshiping Him.
This is in line with the traditional Indian concept that the Guru represents the Divine
Answered by Vikram, 23 Jan '13 10:03 am

 
  
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5.

Like Hinduism many wrong impressions encroached into Budhhism by the latter followers....however the TRIPITAKA the holy book of Budhhism never say anything relating to idol worship
Answered by Pradipta pati, 23 Jan '13 07:44 am

 
  
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6.

Some Buddhist branches do have temples, and priests, while other don't. For those that do, priests often perform ritual functions such as weddings and funerals that are associated with priesthood in other religions. In some traditions, they also conduct rituals associated with Buddhist holidays or festivals. But these rituals evolved within different Buddhist cultures over time, and are not part of the broader core teachings of Buddhism. Priests or other figures that perform these functions are usually also Buddhist monks; most, but not all, Buddhist branches maintain a strong monastic tradition.

However, much more universal to Buddhism is the idea of a teacher, and a sangha or spiritual community. The Buddha described the Three Jewels of sangha, dharma (the teachings), and Buddha (the teacher) as refuges any Buddhist could derive guidance from. Buddhism is still primarily an oral tradition, meant to be passed from teacher to student. Depending on the branch of Buddhism, a teacher ...more
Answered by iqbal seth, 23 Jan '13 07:12 am

 
  
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