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Q.

Which bird is the king of the air

Tags: travel, science, environment
Asked by KVP Nambiar, 01 Dec '09 10:36 pm
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Answers (12)

1.

The Condor
Answered by Janis, 02 Dec '09 04:37 am

 
  
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2.

What is the basis
Answered by anil garg, 02 Dec '09 12:02 am

 
  
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3.

Eagle
Answered by sarya mitra, 16 Dec '09 11:37 pm

 
  
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4.

All birds are kings....
Answered by madhavi, 08 Dec '09 07:59 am

 
  
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5.

Golden Eagle
Answered by Mohammed Saad, 02 Dec '09 02:00 pm

 
  
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6.

Falcon
Answered by mukund kris, 02 Dec '09 06:17 am

 
  
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7.

Golden eagle (aquila chrysaetos)
Answered by Pardeep kapoor, 02 Dec '09 01:37 am

 
  
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8.

The sparrow
Answered by nargis bhambi, 02 Dec '09 01:14 am

 
  
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9.

An Eagle.
Answered by Anand Agarwal, 01 Dec '09 10:58 pm

 
  
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10.

Cheel.... and the albatross !!! Albatrosses, of the biological family Diomedeidae, are large seabirds allied to the procellariids, storm-petrels and diving-petrels in the order Procellariiformes (the tubenoses). They range widely in the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific. They are absent from the North Atlantic, although fossil remains show they once occurred there too and occasional vagrants turn up.
Answered by Oberoi, 01 Dec '09 10:50 pm

 
  
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