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Q.

Why 1st Apr is known as All fools day..?

Tags: health, education, entertainment
Asked by Anil khare, 21 Mar '10 02:38 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

In 1708 a correspondent wrote in to the British Apollo magazine to ask, Whence proceeds the custom of making April Fools? The question is one that many people are still asking today.

The puzzle that April Fools Day presents to cultural historians is that it was only during the eighteenth century that detailed references to it (and curiosity about it) began to appear. But at that time, the custom was already well established throughout northern Europe and was regarded as being of great antiquity. How had the tradition been adopted by so many different European cultures without provoking more comments in the written record?

References to April Fools Day can be found as early as the 1500s. However, these early references were infrequent and tended to be vague and ambiguous. Shakespeare, writing in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, made no mention of April Fools Day, despite being, as Charles Dickens Jr. put it, a writer who delights in fools in general.

Many th ...more
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 21 Mar '10 02:53 pm

 
  
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2.

Its was since long time
Answered by conviction, 21 Mar '10 02:52 pm

 
  
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3.

April Fools' Day, sometimes called All Fools' Day, is one of the most light-hearted days of the year. Its origins are uncertain. Some see it as a celebration related to the turn of the seasons, while others believe it stems from the adoption of a new calendar.
Ancient cultures, including those of the Romans and Hindus, celebrated New Year's Day on or around April 1. It closely follows the vernal equinox (March 20th or March 21st.) In medieval times, much of Europe celebrated March 25, the Feast of Annunciation, as the beginning of the new year.

In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII ordered a new calendar (the Gregorian Calendar) to replace the old Julian Calendar. The new calendar called for New Year's Day to be celebrated Jan. 1. That year, France adopted the reformed calendar and shifted New Year's day to Jan. 1. According to a popular explanation, many people either refused to accept the new date, or did not learn about it, and continued to celebrate New Year's Day on April 1. Other people ...more
Answered by gkr, 21 Mar '10 02:45 pm

 
  
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4.

To make you fool
Answered by uni, 21 Mar '10 02:41 pm

 
  
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