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Q.

What is the big crunch theory?

Tags: education, science, entertainment
Asked by cyrus irani, 01 Nov '09 04:45 pm
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Answers (9)

 
1.

According to the Big Crunch theory, a hypothetical state of extremely high density and temperature into which a closed universe will recollapse in the distant future, a reversal of the big bang in which the current expansion stops, reverses, and results in all space and all matter collapsing together. In other words, at some point in the very distant future, all matter will reverse direction and crunch back into the single point from which it began.

The theory was first proposed by In 1927 by the German priest Georges Lemaitre He based his theory, published between 1927 and 1933, on the work of Einstein, among others. In 1933, when he resumed his theory of the expanding universe and published a more detailed version in the Annals of the Scientific Society of Brussels, Lematre would achieve his greatest glory. The American newspapers called him a famous Belgian scientist and described him as the leader of the new cosmological physics. However, in January 1933, Lemaitre and Ein ...more
Answered by Joseph Chacko, 03 Nov '09 01:09 am

 
  
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2.

The Big Crunch Theory is made possible by Big Bang cosmology, which states that all matter in the universe is now racing away from all other matter. If there is enough matter in the universe to create a gravitational force sufficient to bring this movement to a halt and to reverse its direction, then at some point in the remote future all matter in the universe will converge into an infinitely dense point in space, resembling a massive black hole. The end of the universe would then resemble its beginninga singularity at which the laws of physics as we know them no longer apply. Such a universe is called a closed universe.
Answered by Prasoon Sinha, 01 Nov '09 04:50 pm

 
  
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3.

In physical cosmology, the Big Crunch is one possible scenario for the ultimate fate of the universe, in which the metric expansion of space eventually reverses and the universe recollapses, ultimately ending as a black hole singularity.

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Answered by Saj Sierra, 01 Nov '09 04:47 pm

 
  
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4.

It states that all matter in the universe is now racing away from all other matter.
Answered by Anil K Chugh, 06 Nov '09 02:16 pm

 
  
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5.

Money matter
Answered by prashant prashar, 02 Nov '09 05:47 pm

 
  
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6.

If the universe is finite in extent and the cosmological principle (not to be confused with the cosmological constant) does not apply, and the expansion speed does not exceed the escape velocity, then the mutual gravitational attraction of all its matter will eventually cause it to contract. Because entropy continues to increase in the contracting phase, the contraction would appear very different from the time reversal of the expansion. While the early universe was highly uniform, a contracting universe would become increasingly clumped. Eventually all matter would collapse into black holes, which would then coalesce producing a unified black hole or Big Crunch singularity.

The Hubble Constant measures the current state of expansion in the universe, and the strength of the gravitational force depends on the density and pressure of the matter and in the universe, or in other words, the critical density of the universe. If the density of the universe is greater than the critical dens ...more
Answered by saranathan Narasimhan, 02 Nov '09 04:07 pm

 
  
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7.

According to this theory, the universe will one day stop expanding. Then, as gravity pulls on the matter, the universe will begin to contract, falling inward until it has collapsed back into a super-hot, super-dense singularity. If the theory holds true, the universe is like a giant souffl. It starts out small, then expands as it heats up. Eventually, however, the souffl cools and begins to collapse.Luckily, the big crunch is not a guarantee. Cosmologists are currently engaged in a hot debate.
Answered by iqbal ahmed, 01 Nov '09 05:03 pm

 
  
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8.

The Big Bang Theory is based on the observation that all the stars and galaxies of the universe are in motion and not stationary. The American astronomer Edwin Hubble (18891953) discovered in 1929 that the light of all visible stars was redshifted. Hence the movement of the myriad of galaxies is not random but everything is moving further away. If all galaxies are now racing away from one another then at one point all matter must have been clustered together in an infinitely dense space and its present motion might best be explained by an original explosion of matter. Hence the term Big Bang. The 1965 discovery by Arno Penzias (b. 1933) and Robert Wilson (b. 1936) of the background radiation produced by the intense heat of this "explosion" served to further confirm the theory. The Big Bang Theory brought to an end the idea of a static universe and made respectable again discussions of the beginning and possible creation of the universe.
Answered by Pardeep kapoor, 01 Nov '09 04:48 pm

 
  
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9.

This is in dreams of fiction writers not to bother in our life time
Answered by Dinesh C S, 02 Nov '09 09:53 pm

 
  
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