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Q.

What is subjective objectivity?

Asked by Ritujit Hazarika, 04 May '09 11:36 pm
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Answers (4)

1.

I agree That happens when through ur subjective seeking u have found the ONLY object (absolute reality) !
Answered by Motu, 18 Oct 06:14 pm

 
  
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2.

That happens when through ur subjective seeking u have found the ONLY object (absolute reality) !
Answered by Shunmugham, 05 May '09 11:33 am

 
  
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3.

An objective finding interpreted by various people in various ways is subjective making a classical example of Subjective objectivity. For example take any scripture which is well documented and thus is "objective" in what it carries. The subjectivity in it arises from different interpretations people make from the content of that scripture. Some times we can't say which is best interpretation among many. Each one seems to be true and logical. Thus many interpretations stand out separately from each other thus making all of them a subjective matter.
Answered by SK. Abdul Mohammed Jafar Sadik Basha, 05 May '09 05:00 am

 
  
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4.

All sorts of philosophical systems are built on a foundation. In some cases more than others, a system appears to be founded more or less on an absolute foundation. Often times these foundations are not explicitly expressed, and in the case of philosophy in the contemporary era, they are often outright denied. However, if one looks deeply into any philosophy, I believe that they will find, at root, a foundation off of which that philosophy springs. Some are more evident, and some are more complex, but quite simply, all philosophical foundations assume some sort of foundation, which points to the existence of an absolute or fixed truth. This can take the form of the "principle of verification," which is empiricism, logic, "will to power," and even, in Heidegger's terms, "rootedness" or "autochthony," a being that just be or is.

It is this root of "isness" or being itself out of which all things derive. It reminds me specifically, of the pre-Socratic philosopher, Anaxagoras, who claim ...more
Answered by anantharaman, 05 May '09 01:26 am

 
  
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